Events in November 2012

  • November 1, 2012

    arrow-rightOrchestrating a Career for Leadership

    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

    Location: Yawkey Center, Boston College

    Angela Barron McBride, PhD, RN, FAAN
    Distinguished Professor and University Dean Emerita
    Indiana University School of Nursing

    When: November 1, 2012, 5:00pm (reception to follow)

    Where: Yawkey Center, Murray Room, Boston College

    Renowned scholar and author of The Growth and Development of Nurse Leaders Angela Barron McBride will discuss the career stages of nursing, how nurses can develop into leaders, and the benefits of mentoring.

    Dean McBride is known for her contributions to women’s health, the psychology of parenthood, and psychiatric-mental health nursing. She served as president of Sigma Theta Tau International and of the American Academy of Nursing, which named her a Living Legend in 2006. McBride is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

    Read more and RSVP at www.bc.edu/pinnacle.

    ________________________________________________

    Boston College | William F. Connell School of Nursing
    140 Commonwealth Avenue | Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 | 617-552-425
    www.bc.edu/cson

  • November 1, 2012

    arrow-rightBook Talk and Panel Discussion: Obamacare on Trial – November 1, 2012

    Time: 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    Location: 5 Massachusetts Avenue- Milstein Conference Room East - Harvard Law School

    The debate over the Affordable Health Care Act has left many people with questions about the policy and how it came to fruition. Please join author Einer Elhauge, founding faculty director of the Petrie-Flom Center and the Carroll and Milton Petrie Professor of Law, as he addresses some of those questions. He will speak about his book, Obamacare on Trial, and lead a panel discussion with leading thought leaders in the field.

    When: November 1, 2012, 6:00pm

    Where:
    Wasserstein Hall
    1585 Massachusetts Avenue
    Milstein Conference Room East
    Harvard Law School

    Panelists include:

    • Glenn Cohen, Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics, Harvard Law School

    Sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library

  • November 2, 2012

    arrow-rightInstitutional Financial Conflicts of Interest in Research Universities

    Time: 08:30 AM - 6:30 PM

    Location: Wasserstein Hall, Harvard Law School

    Conflicts of interest are on everyone's minds (and lips) these days, but most of the attention to date has focused on individual conflicts held by doctors, researchers, and others. Institutions can also face important conflicts as a result of their various interests and allegiances, and research universities in particular are at a crossroads. President Obama has called on these universities to collaborate with industry, investors, and agencies to bolster entrepreneurship, commercialize research results, and enhance economic development - and a number of universities have pledged to do so. Should this be a welcome development, or cause for concern? How will this new role for research universities influence their traditional mission to educate and promote reliable, unbiased knowledge?

    This symposium, co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard, will address a number of critical and timely questions regarding institutional financial conflicts of interest in research universities. With a world-class line-up of speakers who have grappled with these issues at some of the highest echelons in which they arise, this event is not to be missed.

    When: November 2, 2012, from 8:30am-6:30pm (followed by a reception)

    Where: Wasserstein Hall, Harvard Law School

  • November 5, 2012

    arrow-rightPanel discussion: Advances in HIV Prevention: Legal, Clinical, and Public Health Issues – November 5

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: ustin Hall, Room 111, Harvard Law School

    On July 3, 2012, the FDA approved OraQuick, the first at-home HIV test available for sale directly to consumers, allowing individuals to self-test and receive confidential results in about 20 minutes. Then on July 16, FDA approved once-daily Truvada, an already-approved HIV therapy, as the first agent approved for pre-exposure prophylaxis in uninfected, at-risk adults. These developments represent dramatic changes in the fight against HIV, and raise a host of legal, clinical, and public health issues. Robert Greenwald, director of the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, will moderate a panel discussion on these issues with preeminent leaders in the field.

    When: November 5, 2012, 12:00-1:30pm

    Where: Austin Hall, Room 111, Harvard Law School

    Panelists include:

    • David Piontkowsky, senior director for medical affairs, HIV and HIV global medical director, Gilead Sciences, Inc.
    • Kevin Cranston, director, Bureau of Infectious Disease, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
    • Mark Barnes,partner, Ropes & Gray, lecturer in law, Harvard Law School

    This event is free and open to the public. Lunch and refreshments will be served.

    For more information, please email, or call 617-496-4662.

    Co-sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center, the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, and the Fenway Institute.

  • November 7, 2012

    arrow-rightConfocal Microscopy Workshop

    Time: 09:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    Location: TBA

    Students will perform the hands-on lab exercises in one of the Longwood Medical Area core facilities, with the help of the core facility staff. Topics covered include:

    • When it is appropriate to use a confocal microscope
    • The confocal principle (or, how a confocal works)
    • Design of laser scanning and fast scanning (e.g., spinning disk) confocal microscopes
    • How to properly use illumination, scanning, and detection settings in confocal software
    • Quantitative comparison of laser scanning and spinning disk confocal, with guidelines on when to use each

    When: November 7, 2012, 9:00am-5:00pm

    Where: Harvard Medical School (specific location will be sent in the registration confirmation email)

    Lecturers: Jennifer Waters (NIC@HMS) and Lisa Cameron (DFCI)

    Lab Instructors: Josh Rosenberg (NIC@HMS), Lara Petrak (NIC@HMS), Lauren Piedmont (NIC@HMS), Lisa Cameron (DFCI), Lai Ding (HNDC), Dan Tom (HNDC), Michelle Ocana (NIF), Eric Marino (IDI) & Tony Hill (Children’s)

    Registration and more information

    This course is offered as a collaboration among the Nikon Imaging Center, the Dana Farber Cancer Institute Confocal & Light Microscopy Core, the Neurobiology Imaging Facility, the Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center Optical Imaging Facility, the Microscopy Resource Dedicated to Live-Cell Imaging Core at the Immune Disease Institute, and the Children's Hospital Boston Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center Imaging Core.

  • November 13, 2012

    arrow-rightPopulation Research Seminar Series: Reliability and Validity

    Time: 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Yawkey 308 450 Brookline Avenue Boston, MA 02215

    The Statistics and Survey Methods Core of the University of Massachusetts, Boston and the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center U54 Comprehensive Cancer Partnership presents the Population Research Seminar Series: “Reliability and Validity”

     Frances Yang, PhD, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew Senior Life; Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Harvard Medical School will touch on the following topics:

    • Understanding the differences between reliability and validity in classical test theory and modern measurement theory
    • Criteria for identifying reliable and valid measures for your studies
    • Writing up reliability and validity statistics in grant applications and manuscripts

    When: November 13, 2012, 3:00-5:00pm

    Where:
    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Yawkey 308
    450 Brookline Avenue
    Boston, MA 02215

    Live Webinar Available: The seminar will also stream online via the following link. Please note that the link will not become available until the time of the seminar.

    Please register by November 12, 2012.

    • Registration is open to all members of the UMass, DF/HCC and Harvard communities.
    • Priority will be given to fellows and staff members involved in U54 projects.

    For more information, please contact Carol Lowenstein (617-582-9063).

  • November 14, 2012

    arrow-rightA History Worth Not Repeating: The Early Abandonment of Reconstruction and Affirmative Action

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall 25 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

    When: November 14, 2012, 12:00–1:00pm (reception to follow)

    Where:
    Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall
    25 Shattuck Street, Boston MA 02115

    Space is limited. Please RSVP to Rachel Milliron (617-432-1892) by November 9, 2012.

    http://www.mfdp.med.harvard.edu/upcoming_events.html#nov

  • November 14, 2012

    arrow-rightSeminar on HTG Molecular Diagnostic’s innovative EDGE system – November 14, 2012

    Time: 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Harvard Institute of Medicine (HIM) - 4 Blackfan Circle - Bray Room - Boston, MA 02115

    On November 14, 2012, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (LITT) will host a seminar on HTG Molecular Diagnostic’s innovative EDGE system. This technology has the ability to measure the gene expression for up to 47 analytes per well using less than a single five micron section of formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue.

    In the past decade, rapid technological advancements in molecular medicine and diagnostics have increased demand for more diagnostically relevant tissue. The EDGE system automates the patented quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) technology, allowing researchers and clinicians the ability to perform multiplexed gene expression studies using a single FFPE slide without RNA isolation or amplification. HTG Molecular Diagnositic’s lysis-only approach and 24-hour turnaround allows for an efficient workflow for both research and clinical laboratories.

    When:  November 14, 2012, 2:30-4:00pm

    Where:
    Harvard Institute of Medicine (HIM)
    4 Blackfan Circle
    Bray Room
    Boston, MA 02115

    Topics to be covered include:

    • The “Tissue Issue” – leveraging HTG Molecular Diagnostic’s multiplex gene expression solution with less than a single 5 micron FFPE section
    • Translational and Clinical Utility – simple lysis-only workflow with 24-hour turn-around time
    • qNPA Versatility – approaches beyond FFPE
    • EDGE system review

    Please RSVP to Rachael Chesser or call 877-289-2615, ext. 135

    Refreshments will be provided.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies. Harvard University, LITT, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those ProteinSimple, and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • November 14, 2012

    arrow-rightMBB Distinguished Harvard Lecture: What Art Can Tell Us About the Brain

    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Emerson Hall, Room 105 - 25 Quincy St., Harvard Yard

    MBB Distinguished Harvard Lecture

    When: November 14, 2012, 5:00pm
    Where: Emerson Hall, Room 105 - 25 Quincy Street, Harvard Yard

    Dr. Margaret Livingstone

    What Art Can Tell Us About the Brain

    Artists have been doing experiments on vision longer than neurobiologists. Some major works of art have provided insights as to how we see; some of these insights are so fundamental that they can be understood in terms of the underlying neurobiology.  For example, artists have long realized that color and luminance can play independent roles in visual perception. Picasso said, "Colors are only symbols. Reality is to be found in luminance alone." This observation has a parallel in the functional subdivision of our visual systems, where color and luminance are processed by the newer, primate-specific What system, and the older, colorblind, Where (or How) system. Many techniques developed over the centuries by artists can be understood in terms of the parallel organization of our visual systems. Dr. Livingstone will explore how the segregation of color and luminance processing are the basis for why some Impressionist paintings seem to shimmer, why some op art paintings seem to move, some principles of Matisse's use of color, and how the Impressionists painted "air". Central and peripheral vision are distinct, and Dr. Livingstone will show how the differences in resolution across our visual field make the Mona Lisa's smile elusive, and produce a dynamic illusion in Pointillist paintings, Chuck Close paintings, and photomosaics.  Dr. Livingstone will explore how artists have intuited important features about how our brains extract relevant information about faces and objects, and she  will discuss why learning disabilities may be associated with artistic talent.

     

  • November 15, 2012

    arrow-rightSequencing and Complex Traits: Beyond 1,000 Genomes – November 15-16, 2012

    Time: 08:00 AM - 6:30 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center

    The Program in Quantitative Genomics at the Harvard School of Public Health, jointly with the HSPH Department of Biostatistics and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, will host its sixth two-day conference on November 15-16, 2012.

    The conference entitled "Sequencing and Complex Traits: Beyond 1000 Genomes" will engage an interdisciplinary group of scientists including statistical geneticists, genetic epidemiologists, and clinicians in a discussion centered on three important topics:

    - What do GWAS and sequencing studies tell about complex traits: is sequencing the solution to localizing missing heritability?

    - How should we design and analyze targeted, exome, and whole-genome sequencing studies? How do we choose among these? Should population-based, extreme-phenotype, or family-based sampling strategies be employed?

    - How do population genetics and functional genomics inform sequencing studies of complex traits? How do we incorporate these types of information in the design and analysis of sequencing studies?

    The conference schedule includes time for scientific presentations, as well as a poster session for submitted abstracts. Two abstracts for each of the three topics will be selected for Stellar Abstract Awards and presented as 15-minute platform talks. Speakers selected for these talks will receive an award of up to $500 for travel assistance or other conference expenses. Keynote addresses will be given by Mark Daly, Goncalo Abecasis, and Richard Durbin. View other invited speakers.

    When: November 15th, 8:00am-6:30pm

    November 16th, 8:30am-12:00pm

    Where: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center
    Harvard Medical School

    For more information please email Shaina Andelman, or call 617-432-7449.

  • November 15, 2012

    arrow-rightSeminar: Next-Generation Western Blotting

    Time: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

    Location: Harvard Institute of Medicine (HIM) - 4 Blackfan Circle - Bray Room - Boston, MA 02115

    The Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (LITT) is hosting a seminar on Simple Western assays developed by Proteinsimple for hands-free automation of the western blot.

    Topics will include:
    • Hands-free automation of the three steps of westerns – separation, immobilization, and immunoassay
    • Dramatic improvement of assay speed and data quality due to method standardization and consistency
    • The age of truly quantitative westerns is now
    • Less time at the bench – more time doing science

    When: November 15, 2012, 10:30-11:30am

    Where:

    Harvard Institute of Medicine (HIM)
    4 Blackfan Circle
    Bray Room
    Boston, MA  02115

    Please register with either Rachel Cantela (617-901-7770) or Winston Patrick Kuo (617-432-1894).


    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies. Harvard University, LITT, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those ProteinSimple, and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • November 16, 2012

    arrow-rightSequencing and Complex Traits: Beyond 1,000 Genomes – November 15-16, 2012

    Time: 08:30 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center

    The Program in Quantitative Genomics at the Harvard School of Public Health, jointly with the HSPH Department of Biostatistics and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, will host its sixth two-day conference on November 15-16, 2012.

    The conference entitled "Sequencing and Complex Traits: Beyond 1000 Genomes" will engage an interdisciplinary group of scientists including statistical geneticists, genetic epidemiologists, and clinicians in a discussion centered on three important topics:

    - What do GWAS and sequencing studies tell about complex traits: is sequencing the solution to localizing missing heritability?

    - How should we design and analyze targeted, exome, and whole-genome sequencing studies? How do we choose among these? Should population-based, extreme-phenotype, or family-based sampling strategies be employed?

    - How do population genetics and functional genomics inform sequencing studies of complex traits? How do we incorporate these types of information in the design and analysis of sequencing studies?

    The conference schedule includes time for scientific presentations, as well as a poster session for submitted abstracts. Two abstracts for each of the three topics will be selected for Stellar Abstract Awards and presented as 15-minute platform talks. Speakers selected for these talks will receive an award of up to $500 for travel assistance or other conference expenses. Keynote addresses will be given by Mark Daly, Goncalo Abecasis, and Richard Durbin. View other invited speakers.

    When: November 15th, 8:00am-6:30pm

    November 16th, 8:30am-12:00pm

    Where: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center
    Harvard Medical School

    For more information please email Shaina Andelman, or call 617-432-7449.

  • November 28, 2012

    arrow-rightStem Cell Therapy and Medical Tourism: Of Promise and Peril?

    Time: 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

    Location: Austin Hall, Harvard Law School

    The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Harvard Stem Cell institute are co-sponsoring an event on November 28, 2012, “Stem Cell Therapy and Medical Tourism: Of Promise and Peril?”

    When: Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 3:00-4:30pm (Reception to follow)

    Where: Austin Hall, Room 111, Harvard Law School

    Experimental breakthroughs within the field of regenerative medicine are reported in the media on a daily basis worldwide. Despite this progress, the overwhelming majority of clinical problems for which stem cell-based intervention offers hope remain therapeutically unproven, and a major gap exists between current public understanding and the availability of innovative therapies.

    This event will feature a distinguished panel of speakers addressing various aspects of medical tourism for stem cell therapy. Presentations will cover the state of stem cell science, historical context and comparisons related to earlier instances of medical utopianism, empirical data on the nature of stem cell tourism, how to address patient hopes in the realm of unproven therapies, and special issues related to stem cell tourism by parents for their children.

    The event will be moderated by M. William Lensch, Harvard Stem Cell Institute. Speakers include:

    • Brock Reeve, Harvard Stem Cell Institute - Welcome and Introductions
    • George Q. Daley, Harvard Stem Cell Institute - Stem Cells: The Gap Between Current Science and Clinical Implementation
    • Jill Lepore, Harvard University - Resurrection, Past and Present
    • Tim Caulfield, University of Alberta - Stem Cell Tourism: Is the Problem Getting Worse?
    • Insoo Hyun, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine - Therapeutic Hope and Its Challenges for Rational Ethical Discourse
    • I. Glenn Cohen, Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School - Stem Cell Tourism, Children, Abuse, and Reporting

    There will be substantial time set aside for audience Q&A, and the conversation will continue after the event at an open reception. This event is free and open to the public.

    Co-sponsored by the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School.

  • November 29, 2012

    arrow-rightScience Shaping Our World seminar series: Advances In Phenotypic Modeling and Therapeutics for Neuro

    Time: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    Location: TMEC Walter Amphitheater - Harvard Medical School - 260 Longwood Ave - Boston, MA 02115

    Ole Isacson, professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Neuroregeneration Laboratories and Center for Neuroregeneration Research at McLean Hospital, will discuss the basis for structural responses to brain degeneration in neurodegenerative disease. He will examine how human stem cells and induced pluripotent cells can be used as models for both plastic and degenerative events. His lab has created induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) from fibroblasts of patients with several key genetic forms of Parkinson’s disease (gPDiPS), as well as from normal controls. They have discovered cell type specific vulnerabilities in the CNS using diverse populations of neural cellsor purified populations of neurons. The hope is that these assays can be translated into prototype discovery diagnostic and therapeutic tools.

    When: November 29, 2012, 6:00–9:00pm

    Where:
    TMEC Walter Amphitheater
    Harvard Medical School
    260 Longwood Ave
    Boston, MA 02115

    Please register for this event.

    A networking event will follow the presentation (8:00–9:00pm) led by Dean Remy, CEO of SCiSOURCE. Light food and refreshments will be provided during the networking portion of the evening.

    Science Shaping Our World (SHOW) is an ongoing seminar and networking series that highlights cutting-edge translational life science research and development. Our mission is to bring together a multi-disciplinary audience spanning academia and industry, providing exposure and insight into the life science advancements changing our world. Further, we seek to promote active inter and cross-disciplinary networking, thus fostering the creation of novel opportunities in life science.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies. Harvard University, LITT, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of the speakers and representatives of Munevar & Associates, Inc., and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.