Events in November 2011

  • November 1, 2011

    arrow-rightPsychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS)

    Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Location: Garrod and Mendel Conference Room, Simches Research Building, 185 Cambridge St, Boston, MA 02114

    The Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) at Massachusetts General Hospital is a weekly seminar devoted to genetic, clinical, and translational research in psychiatry, and is open to investigators, clinicians, and trainees from throughout the Harvard community.

    Speaker: Rebecca Saxe
    It's the thought that counts: neural signatures of thinking about thoughts"

    For more information about this seminar series, including a complete schedule, visit the PGTRS website or contact Erin Anderson (email or 617-724-9076).

    The PGTRS is hosted by the MGH Department of Psychiatry’s Psychiatric Genetics Program in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, led by Harvard Catalyst Translational Genetics & Bioinformatics Program Director Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD.

     

  • November 1, 2011

    arrow-rightForsyth Seminar: Challenging the Concept That Aggressive Periodontitis is a Mendelian Disease

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: 245 First Street, 17th Floor, Seminar Room A, Cambridge, MA 02124

    Speaker:  Alexandre R. Vieira, DDS, MS, PhD

                     Associate Professor and Director of Clinical Research

         Department of Oral Biology

         Center for Craniofacial and Dental Genetics

         Department of Pediatric Dentistry

         School of Dental Medicine

         Department of Human Genetics

         Graduate School of Public Health

         Clinical and Translational Science Institute

         University of Pittsburgh

     

    Summary:  Whereas it is generally accepted that chronic periodontitis has a multifactorial genetic inheritance, there is a general sense that aggressive periodontits is a Mendelian disease. Aggressive periodontitis has been described as both X-linked and autosomal. Therefore, the hypothesis set forward in the studies investigating genetics contributions to aggressive periodontitis is that a major gene causes the disease. After more than a decade of candidate gene studies for both aggressive and chronic periodontitis, no one has identified a major causal gene for the aggressive forms of the disease, which suggests that this defect may not be caused by a major gene. I will describe our studies suggesting aggressive periodontitis is a multifactorial condition and the identification of a gene playing a role in this condition. I will also show our initial genome wide search for loci contributing to chronic periodontitis.

  • November 2, 2011

    arrow-rightForsyth Seminar: New Immunotherapeutic Approach That Disperses Biofilms

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: 245 First Street, 17th Floor, Seminar Room A, Cambridge, MA 02124

    Steven D. Goodman PhD

          Associate Professor

          Division of Biomedical Sciences

          University of Southern California

          Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry

     

    Summary:  Biofilms are organized bacterial communities adhered to a surface. These communities are embedded in an extracellular matrix also known as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS).  Although biofilms are pervasive in the environment they present specialized problems when they become pathogenic and inhabit a human host.  The EPS is so recalcitrant to the actions of the hosts immune system that biofilms act as impenetrable reservoirs of bacteria that occasionally slough off eliciting further acute infections and remote sequelae.  Even more problematic, as the host immune system mounts an attack on the biofilm the bystander effects on surrounding healthy tissue often creates more damage to the host than the resident bacteria themselves.  We have identified a bacterial protein that is common to all eubacteria that is essential for EPS integrity.

    Furthermore, treatment with antisera derived from this protein is effective in debulking all tested biofilms to date.  Data will be provided to show the mechanism of action of this protein and the failure of the immune system to normally mount a sufficient neutralizing response.

    Finally, various strategies will be described to show the utility of this immunotherapeutic approach.

     

     

  • November 7, 2011

    arrow-rightDesign and Implementation of Clinical Trials Course

    Time: 08:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is now accepting applications for Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials, a newly developed course within the Research Career Development Course (RCDC) series.

    Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials is an advanced course created for clinical investigators who have an idea for development of a clinical trial. Over the course of six  half-day sessions, participants will design a protocol, write an IRB application, and become familiar with the central issues surrounding the implementation of their clinical trial. This free course will take place September 26, October 3, 17, 24, 31, and November 7, 2011, from 8:00am to 1:00pm, and is open to MDs and PhDs who are involved in clinical research.

    All applications and related endorsements are due on June 2, 2011.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • November 8, 2011

    arrow-rightPsychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS)

    Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Location: Garrod and Mendel Conference Room, Simches Research Building, 185 Cambridge St, Boston, MA 02114

    The Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) at Massachusetts General Hospital is a weekly seminar devoted to genetic, clinical, and translational research in psychiatry, and is open to investigators, clinicians, and trainees from throughout the Harvard community.

    Speaker:Joshua Buckholtz
    "Dopaminergic mechanisms for individual differences in risk for disinhibitory psychopathology"

    For more information about this seminar series, including a complete schedule, visit the PGTRS website or contact Erin Anderson (email or 617-724-9076)

    The PGTRS is hosted by the MGH Department of Psychiatry’s Psychiatric Genetics Program in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, led by Harvard Catalyst Translational Genetics & Bioinformatics Program Director Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD.

  • November 9, 2011

    arrow-right7th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference

    Time: 08:00 AM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA, 02115

    This year’s conference is dedicated to exploring the opportunities to make Personalized Medicine a reality. It will highlight the current clinical impact of personalized medicine as it enters the health care delivery system and how recent experience may guide and inform the policies, plans and actions of stakeholders among government, academe and the private sector.  Highlights include keynotes by Ezekiel Emanuel of the University of Pennsylvania and Stephen Spielberg of the FDA and panels on Personalized Medicine in Academic Medical Centers and Personalized Medicine in Practice. 

    Registration: http://www.personalizedmedicineconference.org/

  • November 10, 2011

    arrow-right7th Annual Personalized Medicine Conference

    Time: 08:00 AM - 3:00 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA, 02115

    This year’s conference is dedicated to exploring the opportunities to make Personalized Medicine a reality. It will highlight the current clinical impact of personalized medicine as it enters the health care delivery system and how recent experience may guide and inform the policies, plans and actions of stakeholders among government, academe and the private sector.  Highlights include keynotes by Ezekiel Emanuel of the University of Pennsylvania and Stephen Spielberg of the FDA and panels on Personalized Medicine in Academic Medical Centers and Personalized Medicine in Practice. 

    Registration: http://www.personalizedmedicineconference.org/

  • November 15, 2011

    arrow-rightREDCap Info Session

    Time: 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

    Location: Karp Building, 7th Floor Conference Room, 1 Blackfan Circle, Boston MA 02115

    Children’s Hospital Boston, in collaboration with Harvard Catalyst, is pleased to announce two Electronic Data Capture solutions available to the research community.

     

    REDCap and REDCap Survey are free, secure, web-based applications designed to support data capture for research studies. Data collection is customized for each study or clinical trial by the research team with guidance from both Harvard Catalyst EDC Support Staff and the Clinical Research Program.

     

    Key Features:

    Secure & Web-Based  -  Input data from anywhere in the world

    Fully Customizable - You are in total control of shaping your database or survey

    Advanced question features  -  Auto-validation, branching logic and stop actions

    Export collected data to common analysis packages  -  Excel, SPSS, SAS, STATA, R

    Save your survey or forms as PDFs - Collect responses offline.

     

    Info sessions on these tools will be held on the following dates:

     

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 (2-3:30pm)

    Tuesday, November 15, 2011 (11-12:30pm)

     

    Online registration: https://crp.tch.harvard.edu/survey/Survey.aspx?surveyid=2710

     

    Contact Info:

    Christian Botte

    email

    Phone: 617.754.8828

  • November 15, 2011

    arrow-rightLessons Learned: Leadership in a Global World

    Time: 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

    Location: Yawkey Center, Murray Function Room, 140 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, MA, 02135

    Karen H. Morin

    President of the Honor Society of Nursing 

    Sigma Theta Tau International

     

    Internationally recognized for her expertise in nursing education and leadership, Karen Morin will discuss the critical need for nursing leadership in the global arena, and the singular skills of effective, innovative global nurse leaders.

     

    About Karen Morin

    A professor and director of graduate programs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Nursing, Karen H. Morin, Ph.D., RN, DSN, ANEF, FAAN, is president of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International. She was a founding member of Johnson & Johnson's Maternal-Child Health Nurse Leadership Academy. Morin is an accomplished author, investigator, and presenter whose research interests include the effects of obesity on pregnancy, gender issues in health care, and faculty development. She writes an infant nutrition column for MCN: The American Journal of Maternal-Child Nursing. She won the Excellence in Teaching Award from the National League for Nursing in 2003, was inducted into the league's Academy of Nursing Education Fellows in 2009, and named an American Academy of Nursing fellow in October 2011.

     

    A reception will follow the presentation.

    RSVP at www.bc.edu/pinnacle.

     

  • November 16, 2011

    arrow-rightHarvard Catalyst Biostatistics Seminar

    Time: 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Mass General Hospital, Room: Thier 101, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA, 02114

    Speakers: Dianne M. Finkelstein, PhD; David Schoenfeld, PhD; and Paul Goss, MD; Mass General Hospital

    In this Harvard Catalyst Biostatistics Seminar, the speakers will introduce the issues involved in Progression-Free Survival (PFS) analysis in cancer clinical trials as well as other issues related to cancer trials.

    The use of PFS as a primary endpoint in cancer trials must consider several issues to ensure validity of this outcome as a surrogate for survival.  First, although a trial is designed to evaluate progression at regular prescribed time points, recurrence can be recorded at times outside these times because visits are missed, resulting in interval censored data.  Second, the patient may die of the disease before the time of progression is recorded.  Third, patients may go off (or change) therapy or withdraw from the study, which could bias the analysis. 

    In addition, the real endpoint of interest in a trial is cancer mortality, but for early stage patients, it is not feasible to design a trial on this endpoint, and showing a treatment is superior on PFS is sometimes not sufficient to change practice.  These issues will be discussed as will methodology that can be used to refine the analysis of PFS in cancer clinical trials. 

    For directions to the MGH Thier 101 room, scroll down to Thier Building here:
    http://www.massgeneral.org/visit/maps/massgeneral_main_campus.aspx

  • November 16, 2011

    arrow-rightWorkshop on Imaging Technologies for Small Animal Studies

    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall, 25 Shattuck St, Boston, MA 02115

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators and the Harvard Catalyst Imaging Program cordially invite investigators interested in learning about small animal imaging to a workshop on Wednesday, November 16, 2011 at 4:00pm. We welcome researchers at all stages of their research and careers.

    This two-hour session will highlight resources available for imaging small animals in the Harvard community. Presentations will cover overviews of imaging modalities and approaches, and descriptions of imaging equipment available locally, including core facilities. Time will be set aside to allow the audience to talk about their projects with members of various cores and other imaging experts from the community.

    In order to best tailor the event to the needs of the participants, please send us a brief description of your research interest in small animal imaging, including questions that you would like to see addressed.

    Attendance at this event is limited, and registration is required. Attendees should RSVP by November 11, 2011. Please send your name, home department and institution, and a brief description of your research interests, along with any questions you have about the topic, to Amy Webber (617-432-7810 ). We will include this information in a list of attendees that will be circulated at the event.

    ——————————————————————————————————

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators are committed to providing opportunities for collaboration by organizing scientists and clinicians around research resources, areas of investigation, and disease topics. This event is part of a series of seminars and workshops designed to increase connectivity in the Harvard Catalyst community.

  • November 17, 2011

    arrow-rightQuantitative Issues in Genomic Medicine

    Time: 08:00 AM - 6:30 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Ave Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA

    The Program in Quantitative Genomics at the Harvard School of Public Health, jointly with the HSPH Department of Biostatistics and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will host its 5th two-day conference on November 17-18, 2011 at the Joseph B. Martin Conference at Harvard Medical School.

     

     

    The conference will be entitled "Quantitative Issues in Genomic Medicine" and will engage an interdisciplinary group of scientists including biostatisticians, computational biologists, clinicians, genetic epidemiologists, and molecular biologists in a discussion centered on three important topics: 

     

     

    –      Quantitative issues in personalized medicine, in particular design, analysis and regulatory issues in genetic-based clinical trials


    –      Reproducibility and validation of genomic signatures in translational medicine, in particular how to assure the quality of genomic discovery science for clinical applications


    –      Genetic risk prediction, including values and strategies to incorporate genetic information to improve disease risk prediction.

     

     

    The conference schedule includes time for scientific presentations, as well as time for more informal panel and round-table discussions.  A poster session will also be held to display selected abstracts relating to this year's theme.  Top abstracts will also either be selected for short talks to be presented at the conference, or for the Stellar Abstract Awards, which provide up to $500 in travel assistance.  We hope the conference will spur discussions and future developments in the field and generate a white-paper report. 

     

    Speakers: Lon Cardon, Gilbert Omenn, Cecile Janssens, Donald Berry, Sue-Jane Wang, Richard Simon, Keith Baggerly, Robert Califf, Steven Shak, Mitch Gail, Elizabeth Claus, Paul Pharoah

     

    Contact Person: Shaina Andelman (617-432-7449); sandelma@hsph.harvard.edu

     

    Website: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/research/pqg-conference-2011/

     

  • November 17, 2011

    arrow-rightForsyth Seminar

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Seminar Room A, 245 First St, 17th Floor, Cambridge MA, 02142

    Presentation:  Sex Steroids and the Skeleton 

    Speaker:   Sundeep Khosla, M.D.    

     

    Summary:  Estrogen deficiency is the major cause of early postmenopausal bone loss in women and also contributes to the late phase of bone loss in aging women.  Considerable work over the past decade has shown, however, that estrogen is also the dominant regulator of bone metabolism in men.  These studies, in turn, have provided important information regarding the dose-relationships between estrogen levels and bone turnover/bone loss that are also relevant to women.  Initial studies in a male with homozygous deletions in estrogen receptor (ER)α and in additional men deficient in the enzyme responsible for the final step in estrogen synthesis, aromatase, demonstrated that even in men, estrogen was required for epiphyseal closure and the acquisition of bone mass during growth.  Using a direct interventional design, we subsequently showed that estrogen was the major sex steroid regulating bone resorption in men, with both estrogen and testosterone contributing to the maintenance of bone formation.  Studies using raloxifene in men found that only men with low endogenous estradiol levels had a beneficial skeletal response to a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM); these findings are entirely consistent with data in women showing that raloxifene has beneficial skeletal effects in estrogen-deficient, postmenopausal women, but causes bone loss in estrogen-sufficient, premenopausal women.

    While women develop relatively rapid and severe estrogen deficiency following the menopause, men have a more gradual onset of sex steroid deficiency with aging.  Although total estradiol or testosterone levels decrease modestly over life in men, aging men have much more dramatic decreases in non-SHBG-bound (“bioavailable”) estrogen and testosterone levels.  These declining estrogen levels, in particular, have been shown to correlate with rates of bone loss and fracture risk in men.  More recent studies using central and peripheral quantitative computed tomography, which can separately assess age-related changes in trabecular versus cortical bone, have demonstrated that while decreases in cortical bone (at the radius, tibia, and femur) begin with the onset of sex steroid deficiency in women and men, trabecular bone loss (at the spine, femur, and radius/tibia) begins in young adult life in both sexes, with an acceleration of bone loss around the menopausal transition in women.  These data, which are consistent with recent mouse studies, indicate that while cortical bone loss seems to be largely dependent on changes in estrogen levels, a substantial proportion of trabecular bone loss in independent of changes estrogen (or testosterone) levels.  In summary, estrogen has emerged as the dominant regulator of bone metabolism in women and in men, although there clearly are estrogen-independent mechanisms leading to bone loss over life in both sexes, particularly in trabecular bone.

     

    Contact: Pam Quattrocchi, email or 617-892-8604

     

  • November 18, 2011

    arrow-rightQuantitative Issues in Genomic Medicine

    Time: 08:30 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Ave Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA

    The Program in Quantitative Genomics at the Harvard School of Public Health, jointly with the HSPH Department of Biostatistics and the Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will host its 5th two-day conference on November 17-18, 2011 at the Joseph B. Martin Conference at Harvard Medical School.

     

     

    The conference will be entitled "Quantitative Issues in Genomic Medicine" and will engage an interdisciplinary group of scientists including biostatisticians, computational biologists, clinicians, genetic epidemiologists, and molecular biologists in a discussion centered on three important topics: 

     

     

    –      Quantitative issues in personalized medicine, in particular design, analysis and regulatory issues in genetic-based clinical trials


    –      Reproducibility and validation of genomic signatures in translational medicine, in particular how to assure the quality of genomic discovery science for clinical applications


    –      Genetic risk prediction, including values and strategies to incorporate genetic information to improve disease risk prediction.

     

     

    The conference schedule includes time for scientific presentations, as well as time for more informal panel and round-table discussions.  A poster session will also be held to display selected abstracts relating to this year's theme.  Top abstracts will also either be selected for short talks to be presented at the conference, or for the Stellar Abstract Awards, which provide up to $500 in travel assistance.  We hope the conference will spur discussions and future developments in the field and generate a white-paper report. 

     

    Speakers: Lon Cardon, Gilbert Omenn, Cecile Janssens, Donald Berry, Sue-Jane Wang, Richard Simon, Keith Baggerly, Robert Califf, Steven Shak, Mitch Gail, Elizabeth Claus, Paul Pharoah

     

    Contact Person: Shaina Andelman (617-432-7449); sandelma@hsph.harvard.edu

     

    Website: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/research/pqg-conference-2011/

     

  • November 18, 2011

    arrow-rightShipley Symposium

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Armenise Amphitheater, 200 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, 02115

    Dr. John Mekalanos, Moderator

     1:00 Opening Remarks by Louis M. Guenin    

      1:20 Dr. Beatrice H. Hahn

                Perelman School of Medicine, University

                of Pennsylvania

                Great Ape Reservoirs of AIDS and Malaria

        

      2:10 Dr. Ruslan M. Medzhitov

                Yale University School of Medicine

                 Host Defense Strategies

        

      3:00 Break

        

      3:20 Dr. Peter J. Christie

                University of Texas Medical School at

                Houston

                Bacterial Type IV Secretion Systems:

                Biological Diversity and Role in

                Pathogenesis

         

      4:10 Dr. Clifford W. Houston

                University of Texas Medical Branch

                Strengthening a Diverse Workforce in the

                Biomedical Sciences for the Future

                Sponsored by the Harvard Medial School

                Office for Diversity and Community

                Partnership

                and The Harvard Catalyst Program for

                Faculty Development and Diversity

        

      5:00 Closing Remarks 

    For more information, please see the symposia website: http://micro.med.harvard.edu/pages/shipley.html

  • November 29, 2011

    arrow-rightThe Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center Annual Symposium

    Time: 08:00 AM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA, 02115

    “The Synapse: Basic Biology and Functional Consequences”

    The synapse is at the heart of the nervous system. Whereas much has been learned about how they develop, are regulated and fail, much more remains to be discovered. This one-day symposium will examine the synapse from many angles including the most detailed molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic formation, to regulation, specialization and synaptic failure associated with diseases.

    The symposium—typically an oversubscribed and lively event—draws attendees from the major Boston research and teaching hospitals, the biotech and pharma industry, Harvard, Boston University, MIT, Tufts, Northeastern and other local research institutions.

    Speakers:

    • Martha Constantine-Paton, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Bradley T. Hyman, Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Jeff Lichtman, Harvard University
    • J. Troy Littleton, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Elly Nedivi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Bernardo Sabatini, Harvard Medical School
    • Dennis J. Selkoe, Brigham & Women's Hospital
    • Morgan Sheng, Genentech
    • Rachel Wilson, Harvard Medical School


    Both the symposium and the reception following it are open to all; registration is required. For more information, or to register, visit the Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center website <http://www.neurodiscovery.harvard.edu/research_community/symposium_2011_2.html> .



  • November 29, 2011

    arrow-rightInaugural Kantoff-Sang Lecture

    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Armenise Amphitheatre (Building D), 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115

    Given the major changes proposed for medical education and the dramatic new landscape for clinical and translational research, a review of both undergraduate and medical school education at Harvard is warranted.

    Harvard Catalyst |The Harvard Clinical & Translational Science Center invites you to participate in Harvard Medical School’s inaugural Kantoff-Sang Lectureship.  A high-ranking panel of senior university and medical school leaders will present its vision, and begin a discussion of how Harvard University will adapt its educational and research missions to meet these twenty-first century challenges.

    Harvard Catalyst offers an ideal platform to help articulate strategic plans to address the critical issues of educational reform and advancing clinical research. This inaugural lecture, honoring Dr. Philip Kantoff, was made possible by generous gifts in memory of Heng-Kang Sang, Ph.D.

    Please RSVP via e-mail for this event.