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Events in November 2010

  • November 1, 2010

    arrow-rightHarvard NeuroDiscovery Center Annual Symposium

    Time: 08:00 AM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

    “Genetic Frontiers of Neurologic Disease”

    The Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center is dedicated to understanding the mechanisms behind neurodegenerative diseases and using that understanding to explore clinically relevant applications. Their annual symposium highlights this translational theme and gives speakers an opportunity to present recent developments and to discuss their implications.

    This symposium will help the translational neuroscience research community better understand the very rapidly evolving role of genetics in their field.

    The symposium—typically an oversubscribed and lively event—draws attendees from the major Boston research and teaching hospitals, the biotech and pharma industry, Harvard, Boston University, MIT, Tufts, Northeastern and other local research institutions.

    Speakers:

    • Daniel Geschwind, UCLA
    • David Goldstein, Duke University
    • Robert C. Green, Boston University School of Medicine
    • Stephen Hauser, UCSF
    • Nan Laird, Harvard School of Public Health
    • James Lupski, Baylor College of Medicine
    • Jonathan Mill, King’s College, London
    • Peter St. George-Hyslop, University of Cambridge
    • Rudolph Tanzi, Massachusetts General Hospital

    Both the symposium and the reception following it are open to all; registration is required. For more information, or to register, visit the Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center website.

  • November 1, 2010

    arrow-rightImaging in Oncology

    Time: 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Room 3.120, Simches Research Building, MGH, 185 Ca

    This module covers all modalities used for clinical and preclinical imaging in oncology. Among other topics, emphasis is put on the role of imaging for clinical trials, the use of biomarkers in quantitative imaging, and metabolic response assessment.

    Click here to register.

  • November 2, 2010

    arrow-rightHarvard Catalyst Program for Faculty Development and Diversity Lecture

    Time: 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall, Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Peter R. MacLeish, PhD
    George H.W. and Barbara P. Bush Professor of Neuroscience
    Professor and Chairman, Department of Neurobiology
    Director, Neuroscience Institute
    Morehouse School of Medicine

    Dr. MacLeish's work is directed toward understanding the functional organization of the vertebrate retina and the role of a gene, nna1, discovered by Dr. Holly Soares, in the processes of axon regeneration and Purkinje cell viability. For the retinal project, the approach is to use single, isolated cells from the adult to study functional components such as phototransduction and signal processing. One current project examines the calcium dynamics within different compartments of these cells. The techniques used are whole-cell patch clamping and optical recording using calcium-sensitive indicators. Currently, both an amphibian and a primate system are available for short and long term experiments. One possible clinical application is the use of intact isolated cells for transplantation into retinae that have lost cells due to disease or trauma with the hope of sight restoration.

    A separate project focuses on the trans-differentiation of the retinal pigment epithelium into neural retinal, a process that occurs in mature newts and salamanders and in embryonic chickens. Molecular markers are being developed to describe the retinal regeneration process more fully and an in vitro model system has been established to identify the primary induction event in the process. Histological, molecular biological and electrophysiological techniques are used in these studies. A long-term goal is to direct the trans-differentiation of retinal pigment epithelium cells of mammals to produce functional retina to replace diseased or damaged tissue in the adult.

    For the axon regeneration and Purkinje cell viability project, the approach is to follow, or control, the expression of nna1 under specific conditions. The availability of pcd (Purkinje cell degeneration) mice in which mutations in nna1 exist, will be helpful in identifying the possible role of nna1 in specific cellular processes. In vitro models of wild type cells and tissue will also be used in deciphering the role of nna1 in axon regeneration and cell viability. The techniques of electrophysiology, optical imaging and molecular biology will be used in these studies.

    This event is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst PFDD, the HMS Office of Diversity and Community Partnership, and the HMS Department of Neurobiology.

  • November 2, 2010

    arrow-rightIllumina microarray data analysis using R/Bioconductor

    Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    Location: Room 403, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Illumina microarrays are becoming a popular microarray platform. This workshop will demonstrate lumi package that provides an integrated solution for the bead-level Illumina microarray data analysis. The hands-on workshop covers data input, quality control, variance stabilization, normalization, and differential expression.

    Click here to register.

  • November 9, 2010

    arrow-rightFDA Inspections, 483's and Warning Letters: How to Avoid and Survive Them

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Room 4-002B, BWH, 1 Brigham Circle, Boston

    Are you doing FDA regulated research on drugs or devices? Come to this lecture to hear about recent FDA visits at our institutions and elsewhere. Sarah White, MPH, director of the Partners Quality Improvement Program; and Elizabeth Hohmann, MD, physician director of the Partners Human Research Committee (IRB), will review how these visits work, discuss problems encountered by investigators, and how to avoid them.

    Hosted by the Center for Clinical Investigation (CCI) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. This event is open to the Harvard research community.

    Registration is required. For more information about this course, or to register, visit the CCI events website.

  • November 9, 2010

    arrow-rightTwo color [cDNA] microarray data analysis using R/Bioconductor

    Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    Location: Room 403, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    limmaGUI is a graphical user interface for Gordon Smyth's limma package (Linear Models for MicroArray data). It uses state-of-the-art statistical techniques to normalize microarray data, perform diagnostic plots, and to find differentially expressed genes in complex experimental designs. The limmaGUI package offers a simple point-and-click interface to many of the commonly-used limma functions. The workshop focuses on performing quality control, normalization, filtering, statistical analysis, differential expression, and clustering analysis of two color data.

    Click here to register.

  • November 10, 2010

    arrow-rightMaking the most of the UCSC Genome Browser

    Time: 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The UCSC Genome Browser provides rapid, straight forward access to a vast store of genome-oriented material. Learn how to quickly locate gene information and gene features; how to download sequence and track information; and how to make use of the Table Browser to retrieve data in bulk. We'll also examine other UCSC tools such as the Gene Sorter and VisiGene.

    Click here to register.

  • November 11, 2010

    arrow-rightCSIBD 20th Annual Symposium

    Time: 07:45 AM - 12:30 PM

    Location: Room 3.110, Simches Research Building, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    The Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (CSIBD) is a multidisciplinary program to define fundamental mechanisms underlying Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis, and is sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

    This annual event includes a symposium of presentations by investigators from the CSIBD, as well as by a two-day workshop focused on an area of science important to IBD research. This year’s event will focus on gene-environment interactions in health and disease.

    The symposium and workshop are open to the research community at no charge; pre-registration is required. For more information, including schedules and lists of speakers for both the symposium and the workshop, visit the CSIBD Symposium & Workshop website. To register, contact Mariane Leonard (E-mail).

  • November 12, 2010

    arrow-rightCSIBD 20th Annual Workshop

    Time: 07:45 AM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Room 3.110, Simches Research Building, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    The Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (CSIBD) is a multidisciplinary program to define fundamental mechanisms underlying Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis, and is sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

    This annual event includes a symposium of presentations by investigators from the CSIBD, as well as by a two-day workshop focused on an area of science important to IBD research. This year’s event will focus on gene-environment interactions in health and disease.

    The symposium and workshop are open to the research community at no charge; pre-registration is required. For more information, including schedules and lists of speakers for both the symposium and the workshop, visit the CSIBD Symposium & Workshop website. To register, contact Mariane Leonard (E-mail).

  • November 13, 2010

    arrow-rightCSIBD 20th Annual Workshop

    Time: 07:45 AM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Room 3.110, Simches Research Building, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    The Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (CSIBD) is a multidisciplinary program to define fundamental mechanisms underlying Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative Colitis, and is sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

    This annual event includes a symposium of presentations by investigators from the CSIBD, as well as by a two-day workshop focused on an area of science important to IBD research. This year’s event will focus on gene-environment interactions in health and disease.

    The symposium and workshop are open to the research community at no charge; pre-registration is required. For more information, including schedules and lists of speakers for both the symposium and the workshop, visit the CSIBD Symposium & Workshop website. To register, contact Mariane Leonard (E-mail).

  • November 15, 2010

    arrow-rightAn overview of REDCap

    Time: 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM

    Location:

    Come learn about Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap Survey, two free, web-based data management tools available to Harvard investigators through the Harvard-affiliated academic health care centers. Using REDCap, investigators can create and design projects using:

    • A web browser-based Online Form Editor; and/or
    • An offline method by constructing and uploading a “data dictionary” template file in Microsoft Excel.

    Christian Botte, a Harvard Catalyst electronic data capture (EDC) support specialist based at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will present a series of information sessions at Children’s Hospital Boston in November, December, and January on how to utilize the tools to build and manage online databases and surveys.

    REDCap provides automated export procedures for seamless data downloads to Excel and common statistical packages (SPSS, SAS, Stata, R), built-in project calendars, scheduling module, ad hoc reporting tools, and advanced features including branching logic, file uploading, field validations, and calculations.

    Presented by the Clinical Research Program Education Core at Children’s Hospital Boston, in collaboration with Harvard Catalyst.

    Registration is required in order to attend any of these three sessions. For more information, contact Harvard Catalyst EDC support specialist Christian Botte. To register, visit the Children’s Hospital Boston Clinical Research Program website.

  • November 18, 2010

    arrow-rightLifecycle of an imaging biomarker: From validation to dissemination

    Time: 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Amphitheater D, Armenise Building, Harvard Medical School, 210 Longwood Avenue, Boston

    This new two-hour course will give Harvard faculty, trainees, and students a preview of a new refresher course being given by the Harvard Catalyst Translational Imaging Program at the upcoming 2010 Radiological Society of North America meeting. The course will:

    • Present current directions of quantitative imaging as a biomarker in clinical trials
    • Review the steps involved in the integration of an imaging biomarker into a multi-center clinical trial (protocol development, scanner qualification, standardization of image acquisition, data management, quality assurance, central review and analysis, validation, dissemination)
    • Discuss examples of quantitative imaging best practice in PET/CT, MRI and pediatric imaging

    Registration is required in order to attend. Click here for registration information.

  • November 19, 2010

    arrow-rightWomen’s Health and Gender Biology Workshop at Brigham and Women’s Hospital

    Time: 08:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, HMS, 77 Aveune Louis Pasteur, Boston

    Connors-BRI Center for Research on Women’s Health & Gender Biology Fall 2010 Workshop & Poster Session

    This workshop will feature a keynote address by BWH President Elizabeth Nabel, MD, entitled, “Gender Biology in the Age of Personalized Medicine.”

    All members of the Harvard community are welcome to attend, and registration is required. RSVP to the Biomedical Research Institute at BWH (E-mail).

    If you are a BWH investigator and wish to submit a poster for the session, the deadline has been extended to October 15, 2010. Up to five awards of $1,000 each will be awarded. More information, including eligibility requirements, is available on the Connors Center website.

  • November 19, 2010

    arrow-rightShipley Symposium and Harvard Catalyst Program for Faculty Development and Diversity Lecture

    Time: 1:10 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Armenise Amphitheater, Harvard Medical School, 210 Longwood Avenue, Boston

    Clifford Houston, PhD
    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and Associate Vice President for Educational Outreach
    University of Texas Medical Branch

    The Twenty-Sixth Shipley Symposium is presented by the Charles R. Shipley, Jr., Foundation, Inc. in cooperation with the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Harvard Medical School. The purpose of the annual symposium is to convene scientists to hear the results of current endeavors and enjoy a fruitful exchange of ideas. Dr. Houston is one of three invited speakers and will deliver the last talk of the day.

    Dr. Houston received his BS and MS from Oklahoma State University, and PhD from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Early in his career, he devoted 26 years to microbiological research, studying bacterial toxins and determining their role in infectious disease. He also promoted educational opportunities for minorities and developed unique programs to attract young people to science. Recently, he served for two years as NASA’s deputy associate administrator for education, providing guidance to the space program for developing materials for use in curricula at every learning level.

    Currently, Houston holds the Herman Barnett Distinguished Endowed Professorship in Microbiology and Immunology at University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). And, as associate vice president for educational outreach, he administers a program that extends the university’s reach to science classrooms throughout the Galveston area.

    In 1997, he was elected to the American Academy of Microbiology, the most prestigious honor ASM bestows upon its members. Over the years, he has served on a number of ASM committees, chairing the steering and planning committee for the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), as well as serving as chair of the ASM Education Board for three consecutive three-year terms before being elected President of ASM.

    This event is co-sponsored by HMS Office of Diversity and Community Partnership, Charles R. Shipley, Jr., Foundation, Inc., the Harvard Catalyst PFDD, and the HMS Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics.

  • November 30, 2010

    arrow-rightBLAST tips and tricks

    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Room 301, FXB Building, HSPH, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston

    Learn how to use BLAST as an experimental tool. We will cover the use of filters as BLAST tools and contrast them with the use of PHI-BLAST. We will learn about substitution matrices and how the PSSM relates to PSI-BLAST. We will discuss how to avoid doing a BLAST search and still obtain the relevant information.

    Click here to register.

  • November 30, 2010

    arrow-rightBeginning Data Analysis with MultiExperiment Viewer (MeV)

    Time: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Room 403, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    MeV is a desktop application that brings sophisticated data mining and visualization tools to the benchtop researcher through an easy, button-driven user interface. No programming experience is required to make immediate use of powerful statistical tools such as ANOVA, survival analysis, and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). This workshop will be a mix of hands-on tutorial and lecture. We will begin with normalized Affymetrix microarray data and proceed through basic filtering, clustering, and statistical testing. If time allows, we will explore more advanced analyses, such as Bayesian network analysis.

    Click here to register.

  • November 30, 2010

    arrow-rightBusiness Models for Global Health

    Time: 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

    Location: Hawes 102, Harvard Business School, Soldiers Field Road, Boston

    Join the Harvard Business School Health Industry Alumni Association for Business Models for Global Health, featuring panelists:

    • Una Ryan, CEO, Diagnostics for All
    • Vidar Jorgensen, Chairman, World Health Care Congress
    • Michael Chu, Senior Lecturer of Business Administration, Harvard Business School
    • Donella Rapier, CFO, Partners in Health

    Moderated by George Whitesides, Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, Harvard University.

    Despite revolutionary technological advances in the diagnosis, prevention and management of disease, both acute and chronic, the great majority of humanity has yet to benefit. New funding is now available for both “push” (R&D) and “pull” (procurement and distribution), but access to life saving treatments and adequate healthcare is still not available to 60% of the world’s population. Moreover, public health systems and attitudes are well-entrenched in both the developed and developing world.

    Perhaps the time has come for reformulating both the problem and the solution. Will empowering patients in the developing world by accessing their ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit help to make them part of the solution? Can innovative technologies overcome cost-of-goods, massive scale-up, global tracking, and on-the-ground delivery challenges to change healthcare in the developing world? Also, what are the key aspects of sustainable business models for the developing world, and how can these business models be put in to action? This panel of global health leaders and entrepreneurs will discuss these questions, and also debate those that attendees pose to them.

    Networking and light refreshments begin at 6:00pm.

    Please click here to register.