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Events in October 2012

  • October 4, 2012

    arrow-rightFoxc1, Msx2, and the Patterned Growth of the Mammalian Skull

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Forsyth Institute

    Robert Maxson, PhD

    Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Keck School of Medicine USC

    Chair, Gordon Research Conference, Craniofacial Morphogenesis and Tissue Regeneration

    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

     

    When:             12:00pm

    Where:            The Forsyth Institute

                            Seminar Room A, 17th floor

                            245 First St.

                            Cambridge, MA  02142

    Summary:  The first part of the talk will focus on the morphogenetic mechanisms by which the bones of the skull vault grow, discussing an interaction between the transcription factors, Foxc1 and Msx2, which has a crucial part in the initial specification of osteoprogenitor cells that give rise to the frontal and parietal bones. The forkhead transcription factor, Foxc1 regulates the influence of Bmps on the expression of Msx2 and the specification of osteogenic precursor cells in the developing skull vault. Foxc1 acts directly on an Msx2 upstream enhancer to restrict Msx2 expression to an osteogenic zone in the developing frontal bone: in Foxc1 mutants, Msx2 expression, and the osteogenic domain, expand resulting in the premature differentiation of osteogenic precursor cells and the consequent failure of skull vault growth.

    In the second part of the talk the pathophysiology of craniosynostosis, the fusion of calvarial bones at the sutures, will be discussed. There is a regulatory network in which Twist1 and its basic helix loop helix partner, Tcf12, are at the top of a hierarchy, controlling two independent pathways, ephrin-Eph and Jagged1/Notch. Ephrin-Eph functions in the guidance of osteogenic cells to their destinations in the developing frontal and parietal bones. A failure of this process results in mis-migration of osteogenic precursor cells into the coronal suture. Jagged1/Notch functions in the initial specification of sutural cells and in the boundary between the osteogenic and non-osteogenic compartments in the coronal suture. Together these two mechanisms underlie craniosynostosis in Twist1 mutant mice and, we propose, in humans with Twist1 mutations.

    Please contact Pam Quattrocchi with questions.

  • October 4, 2012

    arrow-rightSeminar: Changes in Brain Activation after Eight Weeks of Training in Meditative Practices

    Time: 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Brigham & Women's Hospital, Shapiro Bldg.

    Integrative medicine seminar: Changes in Brain Activation after Eight Weeks of Training in Meditative Practices: Comparing Mindful-Attention Meditation and Compassion Meditation

    Gaelle Desbordes discusses her research using brain imaging (functional MRI) and autonomic physiological measurements to investigate mind-body interactions in various forms of meditation.

    The Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Harvard Medical School Research Training Program in Complementary and Integrative Medicine based at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center present this integrative medicine seminar.

     

    October 4, 2012, 4:00-5:00pm

    Brigham and Women’s Hospital

    70 Francis Street

    Shapiro Breakout Room

    Shapiro Building, 1st Floor

    Boston, MA 02115

     

    For questions or more information, please contact Danielle Berkowitz (617-732-8545).

     

     

  • October 11, 2012

    arrow-rightEliminating Health Disparities: Transdisciplinary Perspectives

    Time: 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Tsai Auditorium in the Center for Government and International Studies Building

    Provost Alan Garber invites you to a university-wide symposium addressing the persistent problem of health disparities in the U.S. and beyond. What does the best research tell us about the causes of disparities and optimal strategies for eliminating them? What do various disciplines bring to the table in tackling racial/ethnic disparities in health and health care? How can we as a community leverage our resources to advance science in this area and make a difference "on the ground"?

    Registration required. RSVP today to join the discussion of these critical issues with leading thinkers from across the University, including:

    • Margarita Alegría, PhD, Director, Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research, Cambridge Health Alliance; Professor of Psychology, Harvard Medical School
    • John Z. Ayanian, MD, MPP, Director, Health Disparities Research Program, Harvard Catalyst; Professor of Health Care Policy and of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Professor in Health Policy and Management, Harvard School of Public Health
    • Donald Berwick, MD, MPP, FRCP, Former President and CEO, Institute for Healthcare Improvement; Former Administrator, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
    • Norman Daniels, PhD, Mary B. Saltonstall Professor of Population Ethics and Professor of Ethics and Population Health; Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health
    • Paul Farmer, MD, PhD, Kolokotrones University Professor and Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Founding Director, Partners In Health
    • Evelynn M. Hammonds, PhD, Dean of Harvard College, Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and of African and African American Studies, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University
    • Thomas Sequist, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine and of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital
    • Alexandra E. Shields, PhD, Director, Harvard/MGH Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities; Co-Director, Health Disparities Research Program, Harvard Catalyst; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
    • Augustus White, III, MD, PhD, Ellen and Melvin Gordon Distinguished Professor of Medical Education; Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School
    • David R. Williams, PhD, Florence Sprague Norman and Laura Smart Norman Professor of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health; Professor of African and African American Studies and of Sociology, Harvard University
    • Michelle Williams, ScD, Chair, Department of Epidemiology and Stephen B. Kay Family Professor of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health; Co-Director, Health Disparities Research Program, Harvard Catalyst

    When: October 11, 2012, 2:00-5:15pm
    Where: Tsai Auditorium
    Center for Government and International Studies
    1730 Cambridge St.
    Cambridge, MA 02138
    Reception to follow at Loeb House.

    Sponsored by the Offices of the President and Provost.
    Co-sponsored by:
    The Harvard/MGH Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities
    The Harvard Catalyst Health Disparities Research Program
    Office of the Assistant to the President for Institutional Diversity and Equity

    Program Co-Chairs:
    Alexandra E. Shields, PhD, Director, Harvard/MGH Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities; Co-Director, Health Disparities Research Program, Harvard Catalyst; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

    Lisa M. Coleman, PhD, Chief Diversity Officer and Special Assistant to the President, Office of the Assistant to the President for Institutional Diversity and Equity

    For additional information, please contact Anna Schachter, MPH, Program Manager, Harvard/MGH Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities.

    For individuals with disabilities requiring reasonable accommodations, please contact University Disability Services, or call 617-495-1859.

  • October 22, 2012

    arrow-rightLecture: Challenges and Opportunities in the Biomedical Research Ecosystem: The View from NIH

    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: HMS, Building C, Cannon Room

    Dr. Tabak is the principal deputy director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He previously served as the acting principal deputy director of NIH (2009), and prior to that as director of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research from 2000-2010.

    Dr. Tabak has provided leadership for several trans-NIH activities, including the NIH Roadmap effort to support team science, the NIH Director’s initiative to enhance peer-review, and the NIH implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Most recently, he co-chaired working groups of the Advisory Committee to the Director of NIH on the Diversity of the Biomedical Research Workforce and Information Technology and Informatics.

    When: October 22, 2012, 1:00pm - 2:00pm (reception to follow)

    Where: Harvard Medical School, Cannon Room, Building C, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA

    Space is limited. Please RSVP to Rachel Milliron by Thursday, October 18, 2012.
    Phone: 617.432.1892