Please note that the Harvard Catalyst apps that use eCommons authentication are unaffected by the recent login changes made by Harvard University.

Events in October 2011

  • October 3, 2011

    arrow-rightAntimicrobial Resistance Annual Symposium

    Time: 07:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Location: 765 Commonwealth Avenue

    Monday and Tuesday, October 3-4, 2011
    7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Boston University School of Law
    765 Commonwealth Avenue
    Boston, MA

    The Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics at Harvard School of Public Health will hold its annual symposium October 3-4, 2011, on the topic of Antimicrobial Resistance: Biology, Population Dynamics, and Policy Options. The primary objectives for this event are to discuss the roles of transmission modeling, pathogen genomics, and traditional surveillance in understanding the biology and population dynamics of antimicrobial resistance. In addition discussion will cover the pros and cons of proposed mechanisms to encourage development of novel antimicrobial agents. An underlying theme is to encourage collaboration among public health experts, modelers, and biologists in studies of drug resistant pathogens.

    Abstracts for the Monday night poster session are being accepted until August 31.  Submit your Poster Application Form to Alissa Scharf E-mail.

    There is no registration fee. Registration deadline is September 19, 2011.

  • October 3, 2011

    arrow-rightDesign and Implementation of Clinical Trials Course

    Time: 08:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is now accepting applications for Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials, a newly developed course within the Research Career Development Course (RCDC) series.

    Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials is an advanced course created for clinical investigators who have an idea for development of a clinical trial. Over the course of six  half-day sessions, participants will design a protocol, write an IRB application, and become familiar with the central issues surrounding the implementation of their clinical trial. This free course will take place September 26, October 3, 17, 24, 31, and November 7, 2011, from 8:00am to 1:00pm, and is open to MDs and PhDs who are involved in clinical research.

    All applications and related endorsements are due on June 2, 2011.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • October 4, 2011

    arrow-rightAntimicrobial Resistance Annual Symposium

    Time: 07:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Location: 765 Commonwealth Avenue


    Monday and Tuesday, October 3-4, 2011
    7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    Boston University School of Law
    765 Commonwealth Avenue
    Boston, MA

    The Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics at Harvard School of Public Health will hold its annual symposium October 3-4, 2011, on the topic of Antimicrobial Resistance: Biology, Population Dynamics, and Policy Options. The primary objectives for this event are to discuss the roles of transmission modeling, pathogen genomics, and traditional surveillance in understanding the biology and population dynamics of antimicrobial resistance. In addition discussion will cover the pros and cons of proposed mechanisms to encourage development of novel antimicrobial agents. An underlying theme is to encourage collaboration among public health experts, modelers, and biologists in studies of drug resistant pathogens.

    Abstracts for the Monday night poster session are being accepted until August 31.  Submit your Poster Application Form to Alissa Scharf E-mail.

    There is no registration fee. Registration deadline is September 19, 2011.

  • October 5, 2011

    arrow-rightLeadership Training for Researchers Course

    Time: 08:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: TBA

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is pleased to announce that the application for Leadership Strategies for the Researcher (LSR) is now open. This three-day course focuses on helping emerging investigators develop core leadership skills.

     

    LSR is designed to prepare clinical and translational investigators to confront the challenges of developing their research programs and teams. This tuition-free course – held October 5 – 7, 2011 – is open to MDs and PhDs with the faculty rank of instructor or assistant professor, and who are currently engaged in clinical or translational research activities. Preference is given to grant-funded researchers, or to researchers who have support from his/her division chief or department chair.

     

    During the course, the participants will utilize case studies, didactic curricula, and interactive peer and panel discussions to build the skills necessary to lead a successful research program. The course will cover topics including:

     

    • Leading and managing a team
    • Developing programs and projects
    • Grantsmanship

     

    All applications and related endorsements are due on July 7, 2011.

     

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the Leadership Strategies for the Researcher web page or contact the Program Coordinator, Obiageli Ukadike (Email). 

  • October 5, 2011

    arrow-rightNovel Statistical Methods for Investigating Aging and Cognitive Decline

    Time: 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Harvard School of Public Health, Kresge G2, 655 Huntington Avenue

    Biostatistical Seminar

    Neuropsychological Profiles in Alzheimer’s Disease and Cerebral Infarction: A Longitudinal MIMIC Model

    Wednesday, October 5, 2011
    3:30pm – 5:30pm
    Kresge    G2
    Harvard School of Public Health
    655 Huntington Avenue

    Frances Yang, Ph.D., Richard Jones, Sc.D.
    Hebrew Senior Life

    Alex Grigorenko
    Department of Biostatistics

    In this Harvard Catalyst Biostatistics Seminar, the speakers will describe statistical methods for identifying a specific neuropsychological profile characteristic of emerging Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebral infarction. They hypothesized that specific neuropsychological functions are preferentially impaired in the presence of AD and vascular neuropathology. The seminar will cover three topics, (1)  Background, (2) an extension of the MIMIC (multiple indicator, multiple cause) model to the longitudinal setting and its implemention in Mplus, and (3) results.

    The study used data from the Religious Orders Study (ROS), a large prospective study of cognitive aging and neuropathology.  The sample included 502 ROS participants followed from enrollment to death with an annual neuropsychological battery and brain autopsy.  The analytic approach involved the use of Mplus software to estimate a measurement model for neuropsychological performance assessed with 17 neuropsychological tests, extended to accommodate repeated assessments over 10 years.   Preliminary results will be presented describing the general pattern of cognitive decline and impairments specific to individual tests in the presence of AD neuropathology or cerebrovascular infarction.

    Registration is not required.

  • October 6, 2011

    arrow-rightLeadership Training for Researchers Course

    Time: 08:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: TBA

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is pleased to announce that the application for Leadership Strategies for the Researcher (LSR) is now open. This three-day course focuses on helping emerging investigators develop core leadership skills.

     

    LSR is designed to prepare clinical and translational investigators to confront the challenges of developing their research programs and teams. This tuition-free course – held October 5 – 7, 2011 – is open to MDs and PhDs with the faculty rank of instructor or assistant professor, and who are currently engaged in clinical or translational research activities. Preference is given to grant-funded researchers, or to researchers who have support from his/her division chief or department chair.

     

    During the course, the participants will utilize case studies, didactic curricula, and interactive peer and panel discussions to build the skills necessary to lead a successful research program. The course will cover topics including:

     

    • Leading and managing a team
    • Developing programs and projects
    • Grantsmanship

     

    All applications and related endorsements are due on July 7, 2011.

     

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the Leadership Strategies for the Researcher web page or contact the Program Coordinator, Obiageli Ukadike (Email). 

  • October 7, 2011

    arrow-rightLeadership Training for Researchers Course

    Time: 08:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: TBA

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is pleased to announce that the application for Leadership Strategies for the Researcher (LSR) is now open. This three-day course focuses on helping emerging investigators develop core leadership skills.

     

    LSR is designed to prepare clinical and translational investigators to confront the challenges of developing their research programs and teams. This tuition-free course – held October 5 – 7, 2011 – is open to MDs and PhDs with the faculty rank of instructor or assistant professor, and who are currently engaged in clinical or translational research activities. Preference is given to grant-funded researchers, or to researchers who have support from his/her division chief or department chair.

     

    During the course, the participants will utilize case studies, didactic curricula, and interactive peer and panel discussions to build the skills necessary to lead a successful research program. The course will cover topics including:

     

    • Leading and managing a team
    • Developing programs and projects
    • Grantsmanship

     

    All applications and related endorsements are due on July 7, 2011.

     

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the Leadership Strategies for the Researcher web page or contact the Program Coordinator, Obiageli Ukadike (Email). 

  • October 13, 2011

    arrow-rightLongitudinal Studies of Aggressive Periodontal Disease in a Vulnerable Population

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Seminar Room A, 245 First Street, 17th Floor Cambridge, MA

    Presentation:  Longitudinal Studies of Aggressive Periodontal Disease in a Vulnerable Population:  Past, Present and Future Trends

     

    Speaker:    Daniel H. Fine, DMD

           Chair Department of Oral Biology

          Director Center for Oral Infectious Diseases

                      New Jersey Dental School

     

          Senior Associate Dean

          Graduate School for Biological Science

          UMDNJ Graduate School

     

     

    Date:  Thursday, October 13 from 12:00-1:00 p.m.

     

    Location: The Forsyth Institute

                    Seminar Room A

                    245 First Street, 17th Floor

                    Cambridge

                    Contact: Pam Quattrocchi at 617-892-8604 or pquattrocchi@forsyth.org

     

    Summary:  Our model tests the hypothesis that oral carriage of Aa precedes initiation of  localized aggressive periodontitis.  We screen children from 11-16 years old for the presence of Aa and periodontal disease, enroll healthy Aa positive and Aa negative students and then follow them every 6 months for 2-3 years.  In addition we collect saliva and plaque and crevicular fluid from molar sites and retrospectively analyze students who remain healthy and those who go from health to disease.  Thusfar we have screened approximately 2,002 students and followed 92 Aa-negative and 72 Aa-positive for more than one year.  68 (54 were Aa-positive) of 164 developed attachment loss of 2 mm or greater.  14 students (all of whom were Aa-positive) developed bone loss, 9 had disease at screening.  Thus 3.9% were categorized as having LAP.  Over 80% of students were Afreican American or Hispanic.  In the longitudinal study of 25 cytokines evaluated in saliva MIP 1a was significantly elevated 6 months prior to bone loss.  Lactoferrin iron concentration was significantly lowered in those students who developed bone loss prior to bone loss and at the time of loss.  We are currently assessing site specific crevicular fluid levels in those subjects.  In a subset of students who developed bone loss a consortium consisting of Dialaster pneumosintes, Filofactor alocis and Parviromonas micra were elevated at specific sites prior to bone loss while several species of Strep and Veillonella were depressed prior to bone loss.  We are continuing to explore the relationship between these organisms in the category of potential disease. 

  • October 13, 2011

    arrow-rightOvarian Cancer and the Complex Issue of Racial Disparity

    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Gordon Hall, Waterhouse Room, 25 Shattuck St, Boston MA

    Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership, Harvard Medical School cordially invites you to attend:

     

    2011 Visiting Lecture

     

    Ovarian Cancer and the Complex Issue of Racial Disparity

     

    Robert Bristow, M.D., M.B.A.

    Professor and Philip J. DiSaia Chair in Gynecologic Oncology;

    Director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology,

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    University of California, Irvine Medical Center

     

    Thursday, October 13, 2011

    12:30 – 1:30 pm, Reception to follow

     

    Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall

    Harvard Medical School

    25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA

     

     

    RSVP online by Friday, October 7, 2011:

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/PJND56Y

     

    Questions? Contact Veronica Meade-Kelly: veronica_meade-kelly@hms.harvard.edu; (617) 432-4698.

     

    Co-sponsored by:

    MGH Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology;

    MGH Multicultural Affairs Office;

    Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Initiative to Eliminate Cancer Disparities

     

  • October 13, 2011

    arrow-rightTranslation of Innovation from Academia to Industry

    Time: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    Location: TMEC Walter Amphitheater, 260 Longwood Ave

    Thursday, October 13, 2011
    6 pm – 9 pm
    TMEC Walter Amphitheater
    Harvard Medical School
    260 Longwood Ave
    Boston, Massachusetts 02115

    The Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) are hosting a seminar focused on the translation of innovation from academia to industry. This excellent panel of speakers draws from all along the pathway from creation of innovation through licensing, translation to development, and commercialization.

    Further, the panel will speak to the importance of diversity within this pathway. Also presented will be real world examples where these steps have led to vibrant new life science start-up companies. 

    Together with the panel moderator, Dr. Winston Patrick Kuo, panel speakers will share their insight and perspectives on this important process of innovation translation from the research bench to the patient bedside — as it is today and how it may evolve toward addressing the challenges of tomorrow.

    Panel Moderator: Winston Patrick Kuo, DDS, DMSc
    Assistant Professor at Harvard School of Dental Medicine; Director of the Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) at Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center.

    Panelists

    Utkan Demirci, PhD--Assistant Professor of Medicine and Health Sciences and Technology at Harvard University Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), and MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

     

    Rebecca Menapace, MBA-- CLP Director, Registered Patent Agent, Director of Research and Ventures & Licensing, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Partners HealthCare Research Ventures & Licensing

     

    Michael H. Cardone, PhD--CEO – Eutropics Pharmaceuticals

     

    Carol Martin, MPA-- Program Manager of the Harvard Catalyst Program for Faculty Development and Diversity (PFDD)

     

    Joseph B. Lassiter III, MBA--Professor of Management Practice, Harvard Business School

    Join in an amazing evening of science, innovation, and networking.

    5:30 – 6:00 pm   Sign-in begins at 5:30 pm at TMEC Walter Amphitheater.
    6:00 – 8:00 pm   Presentation and discussion.
    8:00 – 9:00 pm  Networking.  You are encouraged to bring your business cards, and enthusiasm, for making new connections with networking icebreaker Lauren Celano, CEO of Propel Careers.

    Event registration is free.
    Light food and refreshments will be provided during the networking portion of the evening. 

    To register, click here.

  • October 17, 2011

    arrow-rightDesign and Implementation of Clinical Trials Course

    Time: 08:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is now accepting applications for Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials, a newly developed course within the Research Career Development Course (RCDC) series.

    Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials is an advanced course created for clinical investigators who have an idea for development of a clinical trial. Over the course of six  half-day sessions, participants will design a protocol, write an IRB application, and become familiar with the central issues surrounding the implementation of their clinical trial. This free course will take place September 26, October 3, 17, 24, 31, and November 7, 2011, from 8:00am to 1:00pm, and is open to MDs and PhDs who are involved in clinical research.

    All applications and related endorsements are due on June 2, 2011.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • October 17, 2011

    arrow-rightConceptualizing Gene-Environment Interactions in Obesity Research

    Time: 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Location: Broad Institute, 7 Cambridge Center, Camridge, MA

    The Harvard/MGH Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities invites the Harvard Catalyst Community to participate in an exciting 1.5-day workshop:

    Conceptualizing Gene-Environment Interactions in Obesity Research: Complex Pathways to Health Disparities
    October 17-18, 2011

    This 1.5-day transdisciplinary workshop will tackle the challenges of designing studies that address the complex interplay of social, genetic, and environmental factors that lead to disparities in obesity and other complex conditions. Facilitating such transdisciplinary research is crucial to realizing national commitment to reducing health disparities.

    We will focus on the latest advances in understanding disparities in obesity, from gene discovery and expression to social, behavioral, and physical environmental influences. Breakout sessions with content and methodological experts will afford the opportunity for focused brainstorming about cutting-edge GEI research designs aimed at better understanding disparities in the areas of obesity, cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

    The full agenda can be found at http://cgvh.harvard.edu/events.shtml.

    DAY 1: Monday, October 17
    Broad Institute, 7 Cambridge Center
    Cambridge, MA
    3:00 pm – 6:00 pm: Working Meeting
    6:00 pm – 7:00 pm: Cocktail Reception

    Panel topics include:
    - Challenges in Disentangling the Drivers of Disparities: Examples from the Field
    - Epigenetics and Epigenomics: How the Environment Gets Under the Skin
    - Stress as a Key Measure for Understanding Disparities: Drilling Down from Population-Level Survey Measures to Animal Models
    - The Built Environment: Impacts on Disparities in Obesity and Related Chronic Diseases

    Registration is required to attend this free workshop; space is limited. To RSVP, or for more details, please email Carly Hudelson at chudelson@partners.org with the following information:
    - Name
    - Primary institution
    - Academic rank (professor, student, fellow, etc.)
    - Highest degree attained
    - Days attending (participants are encouraged to attend both days; please note the two locations)

  • October 17, 2011

    arrow-rightSaliva: The Next Diagnostic Frontier

    Time: 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

    Location: Seminar Room A and B, 245 First St, Cambridge, MA

    Event:  The 18th Annual Dr. J. Murray Gavel Clinical Research Lecture

    Date: Monday, October 17, 2011

    Time: 6:00 PM

     

    Presentation: Saliva: The Next Diagnostic Frontier

    Speaker: David T. Wong, DMD, DMSc, Felix and Mildred Yip Endowed Professor in Dentistry, Associate Dean of Research, Professor of Oral Biology, Oral Biology & Medicine, Director of Dental Research Institute, UCLA School of Dentistry

     

    Location:         The Forsyth Institute

                            Seminar Rooms A & B

                            245 First Street

                            Cambridge, MA  02142

     

    Program:

     

    5:00P   Registration

    6:00P   Greetings – Dr. Philip Stashenko, President and CEO, The Forsyth Institute

    6:10P   Welcome – Dr. J. Max Goodson, Chairman, Dr. J. Murray Gavel Clinical Research Lectureship

    6:20P   Lecture – Saliva: The Next Diagnostic Frontier – Dr. David T. Wong

    7:30P   Reception

     

    Please Note: The lecture is free to all who wish to attend however seating is limited.  Advanced registration is required.  Please RSVP by October 10, 2011 to: Pam Quattrocchi, The Forsyth Institute.  Tel: 617-892-8604 or e-mail: pquattrocchi@forsyth.org.

     

    Info on Dr. WongDavid T. Wong DMD, DMSc is Felix & Mildred Yip Endowed Professor and Associate Dean of Research and Director of the Dental Research Institute at UCLA. Dr. Wong is an active scientist in oral cancer and saliva diagnostics research. His research has been continuously funded by NIH since 1986. He has authored over 200 peer reviewed scientific publications. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS), member of the ADA Council of Scientific Affairs and the president of American Association of Dental Research (AADR).

     

    Dr. Wong is the Associate Dean of Research and a Professor in the Division of Oral Biology and Medicine at the UCLA School of Dentistry. He is a graduate of the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of British Columbia and did his graduate training in molecular biology at Harvard University together with a clinical training in oral pathology. Dr. Wong began his career at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine before joining the UCLA School of Dentistry

     

    Dr. Wong is a dentist-scientist focusing his research on the molecular determinants (genomic and proteomic) of head and neck cancer. An exciting recent effort is the creation of the UCLA Collaborative Oral Fluid Diagnostic Research Center and the Human Salivary Proteome project, whereby nano-technology-based microsensors “lab on a chip” will be developed for translational applications for molecular diagnostics for oral cancer and oral pathogens based on oral fluids (saliva). The Human Salivary Proteome project is to decipher the entire catalogue of proteins in human saliva.

     

    Dr. Wong is intimately involved with the research training and career development of dentist-scientists and oral health researchers. He has trained over 40 dentist scientists and graduate students. He is the Director of the Oral Biology Graduate Program at UCLA which includes a Short-Term Training Program, a PhD Track, a Master Degree in Clinical Research, the dual degree DDS/PhD program and the advanced clinical training/PhD track. He is also the Program Director of the recently funded “UCLA Fundamental Clinical Research Training Program”, a 5-year comprehensive research-training program funded by the NIDCR. Dr. Wong is the current Chair of the NIDCR Special Grant Review Committee.

  • October 18, 2011

    arrow-rightConceptualizing Gene-Environment Interactions in Obesity Research

    Time: 08:00 AM - 3:00 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Ave Louis Pasteur

    The Harvard/MGH Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities invites the Harvard Catalyst Community to participate in an exciting 1.5-day workshop:

    Conceptualizing Gene-Environment Interactions in Obesity Research: Complex Pathways to Health Disparities
    October 17-18, 2011

    This 1.5-day transdisciplinary workshop will tackle the challenges of designing studies that address the complex interplay of social, genetic, and environmental factors that lead to disparities in obesity and other complex conditions. Facilitating such transdisciplinary research is crucial to realizing national commitment to reducing health disparities.

    We will focus on the latest advances in understanding disparities in obesity, from gene discovery and expression to social, behavioral, and physical environmental influences. Breakout sessions with content and methodological experts will afford the opportunity for focused brainstorming about cutting-edge GEI research designs aimed at better understanding disparities in the areas of obesity, cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

    The full agenda can be found at http://cgvh.harvard.edu/events.shtml.

    DAY 2: Tuesday, October 18
    Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur
    Boston, MA
    7:30 am – 8:30 am: Continental Breakfast
    8:30 am – 3:00 pm: Working Meeting (including lunch)

    Panel topics include:
    - Challenges in Disentangling the Drivers of Disparities: Examples from the Field
    - Epigenetics and Epigenomics: How the Environment Gets Under the Skin
    - Stress as a Key Measure for Understanding Disparities: Drilling Down from Population-Level Survey Measures to Animal Models
    - The Built Environment: Impacts on Disparities in Obesity and Related Chronic Diseases

    Registration is required to attend this free workshop; space is limited. To RSVP, or for more details, please email Carly Hudelson at chudelson@partners.org with the following information:
    - Name
    - Primary institution
    - Academic rank (professor, student, fellow, etc.)
    - Highest degree attained
    - Days attending (participants are encouraged to attend both days; please note the two locations)

  • October 20, 2011

    arrow-rightCareer Development Series: Federal Funding Opportunities

    Time: 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Location: Gordon Hall, HMS, 25 Shattuck St, Waterhouse Room, Boston, MA 02115

    As part of the Career Development Series, this session on federal funding opportunities will provide the participants with comprehensive and current information on career prospects and resources available through the National Institutes of Health.  With so many resources available, there can be confusion about which roads will lead to professional advancement. The goal of this program is to guide attendees through the labyrinth of choices available to them and enable them to gain access to the appropriate support and resources for their needs.

    Joan Y. Reede, MD, MPH, MBA will moderate the panel and will make sure that each panelist provides the participants with comprehensive and current information in his/her area of expertise. Regina Smith James, MD will provide information on the NIH Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Biomedical Research. Stephen J. Korn, PhD will discuss the NIH Extramural and Intramural Grants/Awards. Charles R. Dearolf, PhD will provide information on the NIH Research Project Grant (RO1) and Loan Repayment Programs.

    Objectives:
    After participating in this activity, attendees should be able to:

    ·     Obtain current information on opportunities and resources available through the National Institutes of Health

    ·     Obtain information on grants, awards, research supplements and loan repayment programs

    ·     Identify intramural training programs: postdoctoral, research fellowship and intramural tracks

    ·     Recognize which federal funding opportunity best matches the attendee’s professional goal

    CME/Accreditation:
    The Massachusetts Medical Society designates this live activity for a maximum of 3.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the Joint Sponsorship of the Massachusetts Medical Society and Biomedical Science Careers Program.

    The Massachusetts Medical Society is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Directions: Click here for driving and public transportation directions and parking information.

    Registration Fee:
    $15.00 (includes optional networking dinner).  Payment is required at time of registration.  Cancellations received in writing on or before October 13, 2011 will be refunded, less a 20% administrative charge.  No refunds can be made after this date. 

    To register:
    Online: Click the "more info" button below
    Download the registration form
    By telephone: Call 800-843-6356  

  • October 24, 2011

    arrow-rightDesign and Implementation of Clinical Trials Course

    Time: 08:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is now accepting applications for Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials, a newly developed course within the Research Career Development Course (RCDC) series.

    Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials is an advanced course created for clinical investigators who have an idea for development of a clinical trial. Over the course of six  half-day sessions, participants will design a protocol, write an IRB application, and become familiar with the central issues surrounding the implementation of their clinical trial. This free course will take place September 26, October 3, 17, 24, 31, and November 7, 2011, from 8:00am to 1:00pm, and is open to MDs and PhDs who are involved in clinical research.

    All applications and related endorsements are due on June 2, 2011.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • October 25, 2011

    arrow-rightAutism Consortium Symposium

    Time: 08:30 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA

    Registration opens at 8:30 AM.  From 8:30 - 9:30 AM there will be a Family Resource and Research Fair with information booths featuring local autism programs, as well as information on enrolling in the latest research studies.

    The morning session begins at 9:30 am with a welcome by Executive Director, Deirdre Phillips

    A plenary session on New Visions for Autism Treatment which will feature Christopher McDougle, MD, Head of the Lurie Family Autism Center at Massachusetts General Hospital; Jean Frazier, MD, Chair of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and UMass Memorial Medical Center; and William Barbaresi, MD, Associate Chief of the Division of Developmental Medicine at Children's Hospital Boston. 

    A talk on Bridging Clinical Care and Clinical Research by Roula Choueiri, MD, a Neurodevelopmental Pediatrician at the Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center will follow.

    Next, Dennis Wall, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pathology and Director of the Computational Biology Initiative at Harvard Medical School will present on his work on Shortening the Behavioral Diagnosis of Autism Through Artificial Intelligence and Mobile Health Technologies.

    Lunch will offer a poster session highlighting research in progress.

    The afternoon will begin with an important and timely session on Relaying Research Findings to Families: Ethical and Legal Considerations by Pearl O'Rourke, MD, Director, Human Research Affairs at Partners Health Care System.

    Following this, Mark Daly, PhD, Associate Professor at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and an Associate Member of the Broad Institute will provide an update on Autism Genetics:  New Advances and Future Considerations.

     Next Vijaya Ramesh, PhD, Associate Professor of Neurology (Genetics) at Harvard Medical School and an Associate Neurologist at MGH will discuss her work on Neuronal E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Pam in TSC/mTORC1 Signaling and Synapse Development. 

    Several other talks are being planned and a reception for all will conclude the day.  Check the website often for updates and the complete agenda at www.autismconsortium.org 

     

    Register: http://autismconsortium.eventbrite.com

     

     

  • October 25, 2011

    arrow-rightREDCap Information Session

    Time: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

    Location: Karp Building, 7th Foor Conference room, 1 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115

    Children’s Hospital Boston, in collaboration with Harvard Catalyst, is pleased to announce two Electronic Data Capture solutions available to the research community.

     

    REDCap and REDCap Survey are free, secure, web-based applications designed to support data capture for research studies. Data collection is customized for each study or clinical trial by the research team with guidance from both Harvard Catalyst EDC Support Staff and the Clinical Research Program.

     

    Key Features:

    Secure & Web-Based  -  Input data from anywhere in the world

    Fully Customizable - You are in total control of shaping your database or survey

    Advanced question features  -  Auto-validation, branching logic and stop actions

    Export collected data to common analysis packages  -  Excel, SPSS, SAS, STATA, R

    Save your survey or forms as PDFs - Collect responses offline.

     

    Info sessions on these tools will be held on the following dates:

     

    Tuesday, October 25, 2011 (2-3:30pm)

    Tuesday, November 15, 2011 (11-12:30pm)

     

    Online registration: https://crp.tch.harvard.edu/survey/Survey.aspx?surveyid=2710

     

    Contact Info:

    Christian Botte

    email

    Phone: 617.754.8828

  • October 26, 2011

    arrow-rightAmerican Society of Microbiology Region I Annual Meeting

    Time: 07:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Location: The Lantana, 43 Scanlon Drive, Randolph, MA 02368

    Topics include:

    • Healthcare-Associated Infections: Clostridium difficile & Gram Negative Rods
    •  Food Microbiology
    •  TB diagnostics: Present & Future
    •  Creating Communities for Immunity
    •  Innovative Diagnostics: an Industry Perspective
    •  Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases 

    For more information see the preliminary program: http://www.asm.org/branch/brNoE/2011RegionIMtg-PreliminaryProgram.pdf

    Online registration: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e4h24t7w10887c86&llr=g8sdkygab

  • October 27, 2011

    arrow-rightAmerican Society of Microbiology Region I Annual Meeting

    Time: 07:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Location: The Lantana, 43 Scanlon Drive, Randolph, MA 02368

    Topics include:

    • Healthcare-Associated Infections: Clostridium difficile & Gram Negative Rods
    •  Food Microbiology
    •  TB diagnostics: Present & Future
    •  Creating Communities for Immunity
    •  Innovative Diagnostics: an Industry Perspective
    •  Emerging and Re-emerging Infectious Diseases 

    For more information see the preliminary program: http://www.asm.org/branch/brNoE/2011RegionIMtg-PreliminaryProgram.pdf

    Online registration: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07e4h24t7w10887c86&llr=g8sdkygab

  • October 27, 2011

    arrow-right“Health Policy, Public Service and Leadership in the Era of Health Reform”

    Time: 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

    Location: TMEC Walter Amphitheater, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115

    2011 Leadership Forum

    Howard K. Koh, M.D., M.P.H.

    Assistant Secretary for Health

    U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

    Harvard School of Public Health Division of Policy Translation and Leadership Development

    The Commonwealth Fund/Harvard University Fellowship in Minority Health Policy

     

    RSVP online by October 26, 2011: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/YJQ5383

     

    More questions: Phone: 617-432-4698, Email.

     

  • October 28, 2011

    arrow-right“Health Care Reform – Leadership in a Time of Chaos”

    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Waterhouse Room, Gordon Hall – 1st floor, 25 Shattuck Street, Boston, MA, 02115

    Leadership Forum

     

    “Health Care Reform – Leadership in a Time of Chaos

     

    John R. Lumpkin, M.D., M.P.H.

    Senior Vice President

    Director, Health Care Group

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

     

    Friday, October 28, 2011

    12:30 – 1:30 pm, Reception to follow. 

    RSVP online by Friday, October 21, 2011:

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/K7ZK9SV

     

    Questions? Contact Christine Colacino: email; (617) 432-2922.

     

     

  • October 31, 2011

    arrow-rightDesign and Implementation of Clinical Trials Course

    Time: 08:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is now accepting applications for Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials, a newly developed course within the Research Career Development Course (RCDC) series.

    Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials is an advanced course created for clinical investigators who have an idea for development of a clinical trial. Over the course of six  half-day sessions, participants will design a protocol, write an IRB application, and become familiar with the central issues surrounding the implementation of their clinical trial. This free course will take place September 26, October 3, 17, 24, 31, and November 7, 2011, from 8:00am to 1:00pm, and is open to MDs and PhDs who are involved in clinical research.

    All applications and related endorsements are due on June 2, 2011.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the Design and Implementation of Clinical Trials page on the Harvard Catalyst website.