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Events in June 2011

  • June 1, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction and analysis of microRNAs

    Time: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a growing class of small, noncoding RNAs (22-24nt) that regulate gene expression by targeting mRNAs for translational repression, degradation, or both. These molecules are emerging as important modulators in cellular pathways such as growth and proliferation, apoptosis, and developmental timing. Mutation, dysfunction, and/or dysregulation of miRNAs may give rise to diseases such as coronary artery disease, cancer, diabetes, AIDS, hepatitis, and obesity. In this introductory course, participants will learn the latest information about miRNAs and the use of miRNAs as a diagnostic tool. This workshop will also teach researchers about miRNA quality analysis, RT-PCR, quantification of miRNA and miRNA target prediction by bioinformatics analysis.

     

  • June 2, 2011

    arrow-rightWorkshop on Infectious Disease Research Resources

    Time: 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Room # 4930, 4th Floor, Suite 4A, Schiff Conference Center, MGH, 55 Fruit Street, Boston

    Thursday, June 2, 2011, 4:00pm – 5:30pm
    Room # 4930
    Schiff Conference Center
    Massachusetts General Hospital/ Yawkey Outpatient Center
    55 Fruit Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators cordially invite investigators interested in learning about research resources available through The New England Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (NERCE) to a workshop on Thursday, June 2, 2011, 4:00pm – 5:30pm. We welcome researchers at all stages of their research and careers.

    This session will feature an overview of the NERCE program, including specific information on core services that are available to support infectious disease research such as high throughput small molecule screening, biomolecule production, BSL3 containment services, and live-cell imaging. The presentation will also include a description of funding opportunities available through the NERCE program. The event will close with an opportunity for smaller group or one-on-one discussions, in order for participants to learn more about the particular resources available to them.

    Attendance at this event is limited to 25 individuals, and registration is required. Attendees should RSVP by May 20, 2011. Please send your name, home department and institution, and a brief description of your research interests as they relate to this topic to Amy Webber (E-mail; 617-432-7810). We will include this information in a list of attendees that will be circulated at the event.

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators are committed to providing opportunities for collaboration by organizing scientists and clinicians around research resources, areas of investigation, and disease topics. This event is part of a series of seminars and workshops designed to increase connectivity in the Harvard Catalyst community.

  • June 13, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 13, 2011

    arrow-rightProteomics nanocourse

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Bornstein Ampitheater, BWH, 45 Francis Street, Boston

     

    Registration is open for this year’s proteomics nanocourse organized by the Harvard Catalyst Translational Genetics and Bioinformatics Program (TGBP). The nanocourse will provide an introductory overview of proteomics for clinicians, investigators, graduate and medical students, nurses, and other clinical research staff with an interest in proteomics, metabolomics, and disease biomarkers.

    This course is offered collaboratively by Harvard Catalyst, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the Broad Institute, Children’s Hospital Boston, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Massachusetts General Hospital.

    For more information, including faculty information and topics, or to register, visit the nanocourses section of the Harvard Catalyst Genetics and Bioinformatics Courses web page.

    The TGBP also offers free consultations to Harvard-affiliated faculty on questions related to genomics, genetics, proteomics, and bioinformatics. For more information, visit the Genetics and Bioinformatics Consulting Service web page.

  • June 14, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 14, 2011

    arrow-rightTwo color [cDNA] microarray data analysis using R/Bioconductor

    Time: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    limmaGUI is a Graphical User Interface for Gordon Smyth’s limma package (Linear Models for MicroArray data). It uses state-of-the-art statistical techniques to normalize microarray data, perform diagnostic plots and to find differentially expressed genes in complex experimental designs. The limmaGUI package offers a simple point-and-click interface to many of the commonly-used limma functions. The workshop focuses on performing quality control, normalization, filtering, statistical analysis, differential expression and clustering analysis of two color data.

  • June 15, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 15, 2011

    arrow-rightReproducible research – using Sweave and R

    Time: 09:30 AM - 12:30 PM

    Location: Room 403, 4th Floor, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Have you struggled to replicate an analysis or reproduce a figure? Did you ever wish it were easier to piece together your analysis code, results and data files to revise a paper 6 months after the initial submission? It is not uncommon for a researcher to be unable to reproduce results. Data analysis in most publications are not easily reproduced (Ioannidis et al. 2009), even when the original data is available. Reproducible research refers to the ability to be able to independently and accurately reproduce, or replicate an analysis or experiment. This tutorial will cover the basics of how R code can be embedded in text documents using Sweave and LaTeX to create statistical reports that can be reproduced by issuing a single operating system command. We will describe how to better organize your R and bioconductor analyzes. We will also introduce some improvements (pgfSweave) and graphical user interfaces (LyX, RStudio) which make creating documents in Sweave/R easier.

    Ioannidis JP, Allison DB, Ball CA, Coulibaly I, Cui X, Culhane AC et al., (2009) Repeatability of published microarray gene expression analyses. Nat Genet. 41(2):149-55.

  • June 16, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 17, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 20, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 21, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 21, 2011

    arrow-rightProtection of Human Subjects Research: Blending Regulatory Requirements and Best Practices

    Time: 07:00 AM - 6:30 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, New Research Building, HMS, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

    The purpose of this conference is to develop a better understanding of current and ongoing research topics with which the research community and IRBs are grappling. Globalization has presented opportunities for increased transnational and multi-center research but the practical and regulatory impact for institutions, IRBs and researchers requires tools and guidance for effective management.

    In addition, the conference will focus on the very practical, hands on requirements that arise during the course of conducting research. Featured speakers will include officials from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) who will offer their expertise and guidance and will be available for questions and discussion.

    Presented by the Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), and co-sponsored by the Harvard Catalyst Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Partners Healthcare, Children’s Hospital Boston, Harvard School of Public Health, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    For more information and to register for this event, click here.

  • June 22, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 23, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 24, 2011

    arrow-rightIntensive Training in Translational Medicine

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program is committed to training clinical investigators through a range of educational offerings that includes the Intensive Training in Translational Medicine and Introduction to Clinical Investigation courses. Subsequent educational experiences will provide advanced training, including Master's degrees.

    Utilizing both case studies and a didactic curriculum, Intensive Training in Translational Medicine offers a comprehensive introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in translational research, particularly in the experience of bringing an idea from the laboratory to first-in-human trials (so-called T1 translational research). This course focuses on the principles and practices of translational medicine as they apply to the development of a new drug (small molecules and/or biologics), device, or biomarker. Case studies allow participants to grasp the real workings of the concepts discussed. Each attendee receives significant training in the pre-clinical development of novel targets and leads, clinical pharmacology, the regulatory process, and design of the first-in-human clinical trial. In addition, participants learn more about funding opportunities for translational research, as well as how to navigate academic/industrial collaborations that lead to the successful development of new drugs or methodologies.

    Click here to learn more.

  • June 28, 2011

    arrow-rightWhole transcript expression analysis using Gene and Exon 1.0 ST Arrays.

    Time: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Gene 1.0 ST Arrays are the latest product in the family of Affymetrix expression arrays offering whole-transcript coverage. Each gene is represented on the array by probes spread across the full length of the gene, providing a more complete and more accurate picture of gene expression than 3’-based expression array designs. The Exon Arrays allow for “exon-level” analysis and “gene-level” expression analysis on a single array. Multiple probes per exon enable “exon-level” analysis and allow you to distinguish between different isoforms of a gene. With “gene-level” expression analysis, multiple probes on different exons are summarized into an expression value of all transcripts from the same gene. This hands-on workshop will cover the following topics: installation of Affymetrix Power Tools and R/Bioconductor to normalize and summarize expression values followed by quality control, filtering, statistical and differential expression analysis using Bioconductor’s oneChannelGUI package.