Please note that the Harvard Catalyst apps that use eCommons authentication are unaffected by the recent login changes made by Harvard University.

Events in May 2011

  • May 9, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • May 9, 2011

    arrow-rightStress and Disease Symposium: Lessons for Research on Cancer

    Time: 08:00 AM - 4:30 PM

    Location: 3rd Fl. Conference Center, Yawkey Center for Cancer Care, DFCI, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston

    The symposium will highlight extant research and explore opportunities to systematically attend to the complex ways in which psychosocial stressors can play a role in shaping risks along the cancer continuum. 

    Panel topics will include:

    1. Biologic pathways/mechanisms of stress on health
    2. Measurement issues in assessing stress along the disease continuum (comparing methodologies such as biologic and psychologic)
    3. Measuring the impact of stress-reduction interventions
    4. Understanding and measuring gene-environment interactions related to stress and health outcomes with specific attention to cancer

    Co-sponsored by the Cancer Risk and Disparities, Cancer Outcomes, and Cancer Epidemiology Programs of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, and the Lung Cancer Disparities Center at the Harvard School of Public Health.

    To register for this free event, click here. Registration is limited. Please contact Dr. Emily Kontos (E-mail) with questions.

  • May 9, 2011

    arrow-rightBRI Translational Genetics Seminar: Bess Dawson-Hughes, MD

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Anesthesia Conference Room, BWH, 70 Francis Street, Boston

    Vitamin D Recommendations in 2011

    Bess Dawson-Hughes, MD
    Senior Scientist and Director, Bone Metabolism Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA HNRCA at Tufts University

    As a follow-up to its successful interdisciplinary research workshop on Vitamin D in May 2010, the Biomedical Research Institute (BRI) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital will host a lecture on ‘Vitamin D Recommendations in 2011’ by Dr. Bess Dawson-Hughes from the Tufts University School of Medicine.

    All clinicians and researchers are welcome. Lunch will be served. Please email Anu Swaminathan (E-mail) to register.

    Click here for directions

    The Translational Genetics Seminar Series brings together clinicians and geneticists with talks that emphasize the relevance of genetics in medicine.

  • May 10, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • May 10, 2011

    arrow-rightMGH Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) series

    Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Location: Garrod and Mendel Conference Room, Simches Research Building, MGH, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    The Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) at Massachusetts General Hospital is a weekly seminar devoted to genetic, clinical, and translational research in psychiatry, and is open to investigators, clinicians, and trainees from throughout the Harvard community.

    In May, the PGTRS will welcome:

    Tianxi Cai: “Personalized prediction of disease risk and treatment response” (5/3)
    Tracey Petryshen: “Role of the bipolar disorder risk gene, Ankyrin 3, in behavioral regulation in mice” (5/10)
    Janet Rich-Edwards: TBA (5/17)
    Deborah Blacker: TBA (5/24)
    Mary Carmichael: “Scientists, Journalists, and the Public: Can’t We All Just Get Along?” (5/31)

    For more information about this seminar series, including a complete schedule, visit the PGTRS website or contact Jennifer Pinto (E-mail, 617-724-9076).

    The PGTRS is hosted by the MGH Department of Psychiatry’s Psychiatric Genetics Program in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, led by Harvard Catalyst Translational Genetics & Bioinformatics Program Director Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD.

  • May 11, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • May 12, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • May 12, 2011

    arrow-rightAn HC-LITT/HCCL Seminar and Lab Demonstration: xCELLigence Real Time Cellular Analysis

    Time: 11:30 AM - 2:30 PM

    Location: Bray Room, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, HMS, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston

    This seminar and lab demonstration, hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will give participants an opportunity for hands-on experience with real time cellular analysis technologies developed by Roche Applied Science.

    The first two investigators to express an interest in evaluating the xCELLigence will be able to set up their own experiments at no cost, and we will review preliminary data with the group on May 12th.

    To attend, please register no later than May 1st, with Cyndi Smith at Roche Applied Science (E-mail, 603-290-4276) or HC-LITT Director Winston Kuo (E-mail; 617-432-1894).

    All participants must also fill out an HC-LITT support form (PDF) and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please send a copy of your completion certificate to Winston Kuo.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC?LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC?LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of Roche Applied Science and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC?LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • May 13, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • May 16, 2011

    arrow-rightHigh-throughput chemical and RNAi screening: Methods, resources and applications

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Armenise Amphitheater, HMS, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston

    The Office of the Executive Dean for Research and the Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators cordially invite investigators interested in learning about high-throughput small molecule and RNAi screening to a special symposium on Monday, May 16, from 1:00pm to 5:30pm. We welcome researchers at all stages of their research and careers.

    This symposium will feature a number of brief talks outlining high-throughput screening technologies and resources –including funding opportunities– available throughout the Harvard University community. Facilities represented include:

    • HMS ICCB-Longwood Screening Facility
    • HMS Drosophila RNAi Screening Center
    • Harvard Stem Cell Institute Therapeutic Screening Center
    • Broad Institute Chemical Biology and RNAi Platforms
    • Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center Laboratory for Drug Discovery in Neurodegeneration (LDDN)

    There will also be several longer scientific vignettes illustrating how high-throughput screening technologies are applied in contemporary research.

    The event will include an opportunity for networking with facility representatives as well as other scientists interested in high-throughput screening. Light refreshments will be served.

    There is no cost to attend this symposium, but registration is recommended. Please RSVP by May 9, 2011. Please send your name, contact information, and home department and institution to Amy Webber (E-mail; 617-432-7810).

  • May 17, 2011

    arrow-rightMGH Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) series

    Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Location: Garrod and Mendel Conference Room, Simches Research Building, MGH, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    The Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) at Massachusetts General Hospital is a weekly seminar devoted to genetic, clinical, and translational research in psychiatry, and is open to investigators, clinicians, and trainees from throughout the Harvard community.

    In May, the PGTRS will welcome:

    Tianxi Cai: “Personalized prediction of disease risk and treatment response” (5/3)
    Tracey Petryshen: “Role of the bipolar disorder risk gene, Ankyrin 3, in behavioral regulation in mice” (5/10)
    Janet Rich-Edwards: TBA (5/17)
    Deborah Blacker: TBA (5/24)
    Mary Carmichael: “Scientists, Journalists, and the Public: Can’t We All Just Get Along?” (5/31)

    For more information about this seminar series, including a complete schedule, visit the PGTRS website or contact Jennifer Pinto (E-mail, 617-724-9076).

    The PGTRS is hosted by the MGH Department of Psychiatry’s Psychiatric Genetics Program in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, led by Harvard Catalyst Translational Genetics & Bioinformatics Program Director Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD.

  • May 19, 2011

    arrow-rightHigh-Density, High-Throughput Quantitative Gene Expression Using the SmartChip qPCR System

    Time: 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Bray Room, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, HMS, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston

    On May 19, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar covering a new technology platform for high-throughput gene and miRNA expression analysis, developed by WaferGen Biosystems.

    High-throughput gene expression analysis is widely used as a discovery tool for genetic signatures of disease states as well as identifying genetic signatures associated with pharmacologic response. There is a growing need for systems that can accomplish these tasks in a cost-effective, easy-to-use, flexible and rapid fashion.

    Speakers: David Ginzinger, PhD, VP Genomics Research and Applications; and early adopters from the Longwood Community

    The seminar will include:

    • Description of the SmartChip platform to perform discovery, validation and screening of mRNA and miRNA biomarkers
    • Overview of the workflow
    • Data resulting in identification of biomarkers for the WNT pathway (end-user data)
    • Biomarker screening data for pulmonary disease (end-user data)
    • Preview of future applications for this platform (eg., genotyping)

    Please RSVP no later than May 16 to Debbie Consiglio at WaferGen Biosystems (E-mail, 203-464-0594)

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of WaferGen Biosystems, and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

  • May 24, 2011

    arrow-rightMGH Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) series

    Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Location: Garrod and Mendel Conference Room, Simches Research Building, MGH, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    The Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) at Massachusetts General Hospital is a weekly seminar devoted to genetic, clinical, and translational research in psychiatry, and is open to investigators, clinicians, and trainees from throughout the Harvard community.

    In May, the PGTRS will welcome:

    Tianxi Cai: “Personalized prediction of disease risk and treatment response” (5/3)
    Tracey Petryshen: “Role of the bipolar disorder risk gene, Ankyrin 3, in behavioral regulation in mice” (5/10)
    Janet Rich-Edwards: TBA (5/17)
    Deborah Blacker: TBA (5/24)
    Mary Carmichael: “Scientists, Journalists, and the Public: Can’t We All Just Get Along?” (5/31)

    For more information about this seminar series, including a complete schedule, visit the PGTRS website or contact Jennifer Pinto (E-mail, 617-724-9076).

    The PGTRS is hosted by the MGH Department of Psychiatry’s Psychiatric Genetics Program in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, led by Harvard Catalyst Translational Genetics & Bioinformatics Program Director Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD.

  • May 24, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to microarrays and Affymetrix data analysis using R/Bioconductor

    Time: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    May 24, 2011, 11:00am – 1:00pm
    This course is a general introduction to microarrays and the use of R/Bioconductor to carry out microarray data analysis. Following an introduction, the workshop starts with a hands-on exercise on how to install R and Bioconductor GUI packages. The course is mainly based on the use of Bioconductor open source packages for analyzing single channel data. R coding skill is not required since all the analyses are performed using AffylmGUI, LimmaGUI and OneChannelGUI, graphical interface to Bioconductor tools designed for life scientists who are not familiar with R language. Students will learn how to carryout the following: quality control, normalization, filtering, statistical analysis, differential expression and clustering analysis of Affymetrix data.

    Illumina microarray data analysis using R/Bioconductor (Hands-On)

  • May 31, 2011

    arrow-rightMGH Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) series

    Time: 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

    Location: Garrod and Mendel Conference Room, Simches Research Building, MGH, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    The Psychiatric Genetics and Translational Research Seminar (PGTRS) at Massachusetts General Hospital is a weekly seminar devoted to genetic, clinical, and translational research in psychiatry, and is open to investigators, clinicians, and trainees from throughout the Harvard community.

    In May, the PGTRS will welcome:

    Tianxi Cai: “Personalized prediction of disease risk and treatment response” (5/3)
    Tracey Petryshen: “Role of the bipolar disorder risk gene, Ankyrin 3, in behavioral regulation in mice” (5/10)
    Janet Rich-Edwards: TBA (5/17)
    Deborah Blacker: TBA (5/24)
    Mary Carmichael: “Scientists, Journalists, and the Public: Can’t We All Just Get Along?” (5/31)

    For more information about this seminar series, including a complete schedule, visit the PGTRS website or contact Jennifer Pinto (E-mail, 617-724-9076).

    The PGTRS is hosted by the MGH Department of Psychiatry’s Psychiatric Genetics Program in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, led by Harvard Catalyst Translational Genetics & Bioinformatics Program Director Jordan Smoller, MD, ScD.

  • May 31, 2011

    arrow-rightIllumina microarray data analysis using R/Bioconductor

    Time: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Minot Room, 5th Floor, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    May 31, 2011, 11:00am – 1:00pm
    Illumina microarrays are becoming a popular microarray platform. This workshop will demonstrate the lumi package that provides an integrated solution for the bead-level Illumina microarray data analysis. The hands-on workshop covers data input, quality control, variance stabilization, normalization and differential expression