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Events in April 2012

  • April 3, 2012

    arrow-rightHarvard Digestive Diseases Center Annual Spring Symposium

    Time: 09:30 AM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Children’s Hospital Boston, Enders Bldg, Folkman Auditorium, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA, 02115

    The Harvard Digestive Diseases Center (HDDC) invites the Harvard community to attend their annual spring symposium, which will focus on topics related to “Stem Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract and the Liver”. The host of this year’s symposium is Wolfram Goessling, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, accompanied by Wayne I. Lencer, M.D., and Richard S. Blumberg, M.D., the co-directors of the Harvard Digestive Diseases Center.

    You can register for this conference by sending an e-mail to Joanne McCarthy. Please be sure to indicate if you plan to attend the symposium for the entire day. 

    For additional information on the invited guest speakers, schedule and lecture topics, please visit the symposium website: http://www.hms.harvard.edu/hddc/info/symposia/index.html.

  • April 4, 2012

    arrow-rightA Primer on Complex Trait Genetics: Principles for the Clinical Investigator

    Time: 08:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Simches Research Building, Room 3.110, MGH, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114

    Harvard Catalyst, the Center for Human Genetic Research, and the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital will hold a day-long, CME-accredited course for clinical investigators to learn the essential elements of complex trait genetics and gain the latest insights from expert faculty from the Center for Human Genetic Research and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT.

    There is no cost to attend this symposium, but registration is required. Click here to register.
    Please contact Suzanne Powell via e-mail for more information or with any questions.

    ***Please note: This course will be videotaped***

    Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Harvard Medical School designates this educational activity for a maximum of 6.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  • April 13, 2012

    arrow-rightNext Steps: Post Doc

    Time: 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

    Location: Center for Education, Carl J. Shapiro Institute, East Building, Room 202, 330 Brookline Avenue

    The Office of Academic Careers and Faculty Development at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is hosting a series of workshops for post-docs and instructors, led by Dr. Terry Maratos-Flier, that will address the specific factors one must consider for future career development, and the paths forward from the post-doc and instructor experiences. These workshops are open to the Harvard community and affiliated hospitals.

    Workshop 1: Next Steps: Post Doc

    This workshop will focus on skills acquired, mentoring received and successful publications of your post-doc.

    To register for this workshop, please email the BIDMC Office for Academic Careers and Faculty Development.

    For more information and questions, please email Elizabeth Langley.

  • April 18, 2012

    arrow-rightAn HC-LITT Seminar: Novel Non-Optical Assay Technology

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Bray Room, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA, 02115

    On April 18, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar covering a novel assay technology for rapid, ultrasensitive and direct protein analysis in complex sample matrices. Case studies for protein biomarker analysis will be presented, including data from analyses of cell lysates, tumor lysates and human serum.

    Lunch will be served.

    Speaker: Matthew Dickerson, PhD

    Topics include:

    • Overview of Non-optical, acoustic membrane micro-particle (AMMP) technology, and how it is an alternative to typical immunoassays
    • Case Studies:
      • Assay development and quantitation of the activity state of multiple kinases including EGFR, MEK/ERK dimer, MEK, ERK, AKT, p38 and JNK on one plate
      • Same assay in vitro and in vivo
      • Minimum cell requirements (<2000 cells per assay)
      • Assay development and quantitation of 6 cytokine assays including IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL12p70, IL-17A and TNF-alpha done in a single assay plate
      • Sensitivity, spike recovery and linearity for each analyte, tested and analyzed in normal human samples and compared to ECL, Luminex and ELISA assays

    To attend, please register with Tara O’Leary at BioScale (E-mail) or Winston Kuo, Director, Harvard Catalyst-LITT (E-mail; 617-432-1894).

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of BioScale, or the speakers, and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • April 19, 2012

    arrow-rightWhat’s in a name? - Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in oral pathogens and commensals

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Seminar Room A, 245 First Street, 17th Floor, Cambridge, MA, 02142

    Speaker:   Robert A. Burne, PhD

         Associate Dean for Research

         Distinguished Professor and Chair

         Department of Oral Biology

         University of Florida College of Dentistry

     

    Summary:  The development of oral infectious diseases is accompanied by changes in the microbial composition and biochemical activities of oral biofilms. In the case of dental caries, it is known that the initiation and progression of disease is associated with an increase in theproportions of acid-tolerant species, many of which can grow and produce acids at pH values well below those that damage tooth mineral. High throughput technologies have been used effectively to quantify microbial diversity in healthy and carious sites, but clear associations of particular organisms with health and disease are not always apparent or consistent. Studies will be presented that address three major challenges in correlating oral microbiome composition with dental health. The first will detail evolutionary and functional genomic approaches to dissect the basis for phenotypic heterogeneity within the species Streptococcus mutans. The second explores the microbiological and molecular basis for the diminished capacity of oralbiofilms of caries-active subjects to moderate acidification through metabolism of salivary substrates. The third will describe the use of a novel microfluidics-based system to study, at the single cell level, the effects of microenvironments on intercellular communication systems of S. mutans. Collectively, these studies augment ongoing metagenomic approaches by disclosing how genetic heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity impact the pathogenic potential of oral biofilms.

    For more info, contact Pam Quattrocchi via email.

  • April 23, 2012

    arrow-rightDental Calculus: A Novel Biomolecular Reservoir of Ancient Dietary and Health Indicators

    Time: 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Seminar Room A, 245 First Street, 17th Floor, Cambridge, MA, 02142

    Speaker:          Dr. Christina Warinner

    Acting Head of the Molecular Research Group

    Centre for Evolutionary Medicine

    Institute of Anatomy

    University of Zürich

    Summary:  Archaeologists have long been interested in the dietary and health histories of ancient peoples. However, reconstructing these histories using conventional tools can be difficult, indirect, and imprecise. Recent microscopy investigations of dental calculus have shown that this mineralized biofilm is a long-term reservoir of food remnants and oral bacteria. In this paper we present novel data demonstrating that dental calculus is also a robust reservoir of ancient biomolecules, including genomic DNA and proteins. Given the near ubiquity of dental calculus in the archaeological record, the discovery of well-preserved biomolecules within dental calculus promises to greatly expand our understanding of human diet and health in antiquity.

     

    For more info, contact Pam Quattrocchi via email.

  • April 25, 2012

    arrow-rightGET: Genomes, Environments, Traits Conference

    Time: 07:45 AM - 6:30 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center Rotunda, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115

    The GET Conference is an annual event that brings together leading thinkers to discuss the important ways in which personal genomes will affect all of our lives in the coming years and to debate the technical, commercial, and societal impacts of new genomic technologies.

    Click here to see the agenda.

    Click here to register and receive a significant discount on the registration fee (normally $225, marked down to $50!).

    If you register using the special Harvard Catalyst pricing, please make sure to bring your Harvard or Affiliated Hospital ID.

  • April 26, 2012

    arrow-rightHarvard University Center for AIDS Research Annual Symposium

    Time: 08:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Ave Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA, 02115

    HIV/HCV 2012: Advances in Research and Treatment

    Click here for more information on the conference and to submit an abstract. For more information on CFAR, visit our website.

    For questions, contact Mark Ingaciola via e-mail.

  • April 26, 2012

    arrow-rightAn Overview of REDCap: A Free, Web-based Data-Management & Survey Tool

    Time: 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Karp Building, 7th Floor Conf Room, Children’s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston 02115

    Come learn about REDCap and REDCap Survey, two free, web-based data management tools available to Harvard investigators through the Harvard-affiliated academic health care centers. Using REDCap, investigators can create and design projects using:

    • A web browser-based Online Form Editor; and/or
    • An offline method by constructing and uploading a “data dictionary” template file in Microsoft Excel.

    Christian Botte, a Harvard Catalyst electronic data capture (EDC) support specialist based at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will present information sessions at Children’s Hospital Boston on how to utilize the tools to build and manage online databases and surveys.

    REDCap provides automated export procedures for seamless data downloads to Excel and common statistical packages (SPSS, SAS, Stata, R), built-in project calendars, a scheduling module, ad hoc reporting tools, and advanced features including branching logic, file uploading, field validations, and calculations.

    Presented by the Clinical Research Program Education Core at Children’s Hospital Boston, in collaboration with Harvard Catalyst.

    Registration is required in order to attend any of these sessions. For more information, contact Harvard Catalyst EDC support specialist Christian Botte (E-mail, 617-754-8828). To register, click here.

    Harvard Catalyst offers cross-institutional support for investigators interested in or currently using REDCap, including explanations of the features of REDCap and REDCap survey (a similar application for creating and managing surveys), a set of FAQs, user guides, links to institutional REDCap systems, and a Harvard Catalyst EDC support team. To learn more, visit Harvard Catalyst’s REDCap page.

  • April 26, 2012

    arrow-rightA Workshop on the IRB Submission Process

    Time: 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Lahey Room, Countway Library, 5th Floor, 10 Shattuck St, Boston, MA 02115

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators and Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program invite investigators and research staff to a clinic to learn about the IRB submission process on Thursday, April 26, 2012 at 3:00pm. We welcome researchers at all stages of their research and careers, as well as research staff responsible for IRB submissions.

    This two-hour IRB clinic will feature an IRB 101 presentation as well as personalized consultation with IRB representatives from your home institution. During break-out sessions, IRB representatives will be available to consult with you on a specific protocol or to answer general questions about the IRB submission process. Please come to the session with the materials pertinent to your research or to your specific questions and concerns.

    Due to the nature of the small group break-out sessions, attendance at this event is limited for each institution, and registration is required. Attendees should RSVP by April 13, 2012. To register, please send the following to Amy Webber (E-mail , 617-432-7810) your name, institution, department, a brief description of your research interests, and the name of the IRB to which you intend to submit your protocol.

    We will circulate a list of attendees (names, affiliations, and email addresses). Attendees may opt-out of the inclusion of their contact information by contacting Amy Webber.

    The Harvard Catalyst Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program helps researchers and institutions navigate clinical & translational research regulatory processes by minimizing the regulatory burdens through cooperation, interoperability, and access to expertise.

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators are committed to providing opportunities for collaboration by organizing scientists and clinicians around research resources, areas of investigation, and disease topics. This event is part of a series of seminars and workshops designed to increase connectivity in the Harvard Catalyst community.

  • April 27, 2012

    arrow-rightImaging Biomarkers in Clinical Trials: Current Practice & Future Trends

    Time: 12:30 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: O’Keeffe Auditorium, 1st Floor, White Building, 32 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114

    Imaging biomarkers serve as important endpoints for clinical trials in the approval process for therapeutic drugs. Various criteria have been developed for objective interpretation of imaging studies. Additionally, there are emerging imaging techniques that have the potential for applications as surrogate endpoints for clinical trials.

    Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

    –Discuss and implement the latest imaging criteria such as RECIST and WHO
    –Identify new imaging modalities that may be used in clinical trials
    –Differentiate types of imaging modalities that can be used for different disease types
    –Improve their knowledge and competence

    Click here to view the program brochure and register online.

    Any questions or problems with registration can be directed to the course coordinator, Ms. Fabiola Khan, via e-mail.

    Deadline for registration: April 27, 2012

    Cost:  Registration fee is $500 for Physicians, $250 for Residents, Fellows, Technologists and Allied Health Professionals.

  • April 28, 2012

    arrow-rightImaging Biomarkers in Clinical Trials: Current Practice & Future Trends

    Time: 08:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    Location: O’Keeffe Auditorium, 1st Floor, White Building, 32 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114

    Imaging biomarkers serve as important endpoints for clinical trials in the approval process for therapeutic drugs. Various criteria have been developed for objective interpretation of imaging studies. Additionally, there are emerging imaging techniques that have the potential for applications as surrogate endpoints for clinical trials.

    Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

    –Discuss and implement the latest imaging criteria such as RECIST and WHO
    –Identify new imaging modalities that may be used in clinical trials
    –Differentiate types of imaging modalities that can be used for different disease types
    –Improve their knowledge and competence

    Click here to view the program brochure and register online.

    Any questions or problems with registration can be directed to the course coordinator, Ms. Fabiola Khan, via e-mail.

    Deadline for registration: April 27, 2012

    Cost:  Registration fee is $500 for Physicians, $250 for Residents, Fellows, Technologists and Allied Health Professionals.