Events in April 2011

  • April 4, 2011

    arrow-rightRacial Disparities in Health Care Delivery

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Pound Hall 213, Harvard Law School, 1557 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge

    Forty years after the end of the Jim Crow era and the passage of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, there remain large racial disparities in the American health care system.  This panel will explore the strengths and weaknesses of various policies that may be employed to alleviate ongoing racial health disparities.  Such policies include those that enhance the enforcement or reach of existing civil rights laws and those that call for more direct and targeted quality-improvement initiatives.  In addition, the panel will discuss those aspects of the Affordable Care Act that may lead to reduced disparities in care. 

    Panelists include:

     

    -          David Barton Smith - Drexel University School of Public Health

    -          Anup Malani - University of Chicago Law School

    -          Gregg Bloche - Georgetown Law School

    -          Amitabh Chandra - Harvard Kennedy School of Government

    The event is free, open to the public, and a light lunch will be available.

    For more information, contact Kathy Paras (Email), or faculty director Glenn Cohen (Email). 

    Sponsored by the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics, Harvard Law School.

  • April 5, 2011

    arrow-rightHarvard Catalyst Program for Faculty Development and Diversity Lecture

    Time: 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: REB Auditorium, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, 188 Longwood Avenue, Boston

    Kevin Johnson, MD, MS,
    Professor and Vice Chair of Biomedical Informatics;  Professor of Pediatrics
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center

    Dr. Johnson is a Professor and Vice Chair of Biomedical Informatics, with a joint appointment in the Department of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He received his MD from Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and his MS in Medical Informatics from Stanford University. In 1992 he returned to Johns Hopkins where he served as a Pediatric Chief Resident. He was a member of the faculty in both Pediatrics and Biomedical Information Sciences at Johns Hopkins until 2002, when he was recruited to Vanderbilt University. He is a practicing, board certified physician in Pediatrics.


    Dr. Johnson is an internationally-respected developer and evaluator of clinical information technology. His research interests have been related to developing and encouraging the adoption of clinical information systems to improve patient safety and compliance with practice guidelines; the uses of advanced computer technologies, including the Worldwide Web, personal digital assistants, and pen-based computers in medicine; and the development of computer-based documentation systems for the point of care. In the early phases of his career, he directed the development and evaluation of evidence-based pediatric care guidelines for The Johns Hopkins Hospital. He is the author of over 100 publications and books or book chapters, is Assistant Editor for the preeminent journal in biomedical informatics (JAMIA), and serves on the editorial board of Ambulatory Pediatrics. He is a former recipient of the Robert Wood Johnson Minority Medical Faculty Development Award, has been principal investigator on numerous grants, and has been an invited speaker at most major medical informatics and pediatrics conferences. His knowledge about electronic health records and patient safety has led to a recent appointment on two Institute of Medicine committees focused on medication safety. He was awarded membership in the American College of Medical Informatics in 2004. Dr. Johnson is a member of the American Board of Pediatrics’ Program for Maintenance of Certification Task Force, and has been actively involved with the program of Maintenance of Certification developed by the Board for all pediatricians. He has held numerous leadership positions within the American Medical Informatics Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    This event is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst PFDD and the HMS Office for Diversity and Community Partnership.

  • April 5, 2011

    arrow-rightHDDC Annual Spring Symposium: Dendritic Cell Biology

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Folkman Auditorium, Enders Building, CHB, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston

    The Harvard Digestive Diseases Center (HDDC) cordially invites the Harvard research community to a symposium featuring the following topics:

    1. Definition and Function of Dendritic Cells and Macrophages in the Mouse Colon
    2. Host-Microbe Interactions at Barrier Sites: Roles of Nutrients and Commensals
    3. Role of CD1 and NKT Cells in Host Defense
    4. The Mammalian Stress Sensor XBP1 in Host Defense
    5. Antigen Cross-Presentation and T Cell Activation by Dendritic Cells
    6. Endosomes, Pathogen Sensing, and Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells

    The symposium is open to the research community at no charge, and pre-registration is not required.  For more information, visit the HDDC website or contact Joanne McCarthy (E-mail)

    The HDDC is a community of scientists focused on the study of epithelial cell function and mucosal biology in inflammation, host defense, and cancer of the gastrointestinal tract and related mucosal surfaces.  Its overarching mission is to foster better translational and basic science in fields related to digestive diseases by:  Connecting People, Creating Opportunity, and Extending Resources.

  • April 7, 2011

    arrow-rightMRI safety: Guidelines for safe MRI practice

    Time: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

    Location: Rm 4-002B, BWH, 1 Brigham Circle, Boston

    Harvard Catalyst’s Translational Imaging Program, in collaboration with the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for Clinical Investigation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is sponsoring this three-lecture series designed to introduce clinical research coordinators, research nurses, and study staff to the basics of medical imaging and the principles of safe imaging practice. Attendees may choose to attend all three sessions or can attend whichever sessions are pertinent to their learning needs.

    • Learn the potential risks in the MRI environment
    • Learn the guidelines for safe MRI practice through real situation examples
    • Provide tools to answer patients/subjects questions about MRI procedures

    To learn more about these courses, and to register, visit the Imaging Program’s course page. Please note you must register for each session individually.

  • April 13, 2011

    arrow-rightRadiation safety and radiation dose reduction

    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

    Location: Rm 4-002B, BWH, 1 Brigham Circle, Boston

    Harvard Catalyst’s Translational Imaging Program, in collaboration with the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for Clinical Investigation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is sponsoring this three-lecture series designed to introduce clinical research coordinators, research nurses, and study staff to the basics of medical imaging and the principles of safe imaging practice. Attendees may choose to attend all three sessions or can attend whichever sessions are pertinent to their learning needs.

    • Learn in the context of imaging the risks posed by different types of radiation emissions and radiation-emitting products
    • Understand how to support the benefits of medical imaging while minimizing the risks
    • Understand the radiation safety protocol screening forms and model consent risk statements

    To learn more about these courses, and to register, visit the Imaging Program’s course page. Please note you must register for each session individually.

  • April 13, 2011

    arrow-rightThe Scientific Basis of Conflicts of Interest: The Role of Implicit Cognition

    Time: 3:00 PM - 7:30 PM

    Location: Pound Hall 212, Ropes Gray Assembly Room, Harvard Law School

    On April 13, please join David Korn, MD, and Max H. Bazerman, PhD, to a symposium sponsored by the Harvard University Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, entitled “The Scientific Basis of Conflicts of Interest:  The Role of Implicit Cognition.”  The event will be followed by a 1-hour wine and cheese reception at 6:30pm. 

    For more information, click here.

  • April 19, 2011

    arrow-rightProteomics 2011 Symposium at CHB

    Time: 07:30 AM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Folkman Auditorium, Enders Bldg., CHB, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston

    Proteomics 2011 at Children’s Hospital Boston (CHB) provides an informative, intimate environment for local scientists to listen to and mingle with expert researchers in Proteomics. This event will cover some of the exciting research from CHB’s Steen and Steen Lab, and will give young scientists a platform to express their current interests and perhaps hint at their future endeavors.

    To find out more, visit the event website.

  • April 25, 2011

    arrow-rightProfessional Journey of a Clinical Investigator

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Ballard Room, Countway Library, 5th Fl., HMS, 10 Shattuck Street., Boston

    Interested in pursuing a career in clinical investigation? Join the Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators on April 25, 2011, for an interactive lunch-time discussion with Dr. Thomas Wang, who will give you a first hand account of what it takes to become a clinical investigator. You will also have the opportunity to ask Dr. Wang about any related topics, such as identifying research topics, finding mentors and collaborators, applying for grants, conducting collaborative projects, writing manuscripts, and finding a balance between clinical service and scientific investigation. Registration is required.

    Dr. Wang graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1996, completed his residency and cardiology fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital in 2003, and is currently an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and an Associate Director of Heart Failure and Transplantation at Massachusetts General Hospital. He conducts epidemiological and translational studies at MGH and the Framingham Heart Study. He has published more than 100 articles in the past 10 years.

    Attendance at this event is limited and registration is required by April 11, 2011. Please send your name, academic rank, home department, institution, and research interests to Amy Webber (E-mail; 617-432-7810). We will include this information in a list of attendees that will be circulated at the event. Lunch will be provided.

  • April 28, 2011

    arrow-rightAn HC-LITT/HCCL Seminar: Functional Proteomic Profiling of Phosphodiesterases and Kinases

    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Bray Room, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, HMS, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston

    On April 28th, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar covering technologies developed by ProFACT that focus on proteomic analyses for the kinetics of enzyme variants, and the assessment of in vitro drug responsiveness. 

    Small molecule inhibitors of kinases and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases have proven successful in the clinic, driving demand for methods to assess drug promiscuity and non-specific toxicity. While such methods are essential to the discovery process, two critical deficiencies remain: 1) proteomic analyses for broadly relating and characterizing the kinetics of enzyme variants responsible for the disease phenotype, and 2) proteomic analyses to assess in vitro drug responsiveness based on enzyme kinetics from natural sources such as from cell line models and primary tissues.

    In this seminar, ProFACT describes its proprietary functional proteomics platform that can be used for these purposes – SeraFILE™, and related Conformerics™ prospecting strategies.

    Topics will include:

    • New enrichment reagent kits for Phosphodiesterases and Kinases
    • Application of a novel separations platform to derive functional proteomic signatures
    • Strategies to prospect, enrich and potentially identify responsive (and non-responsive) enzymes from natural sources, to a challenging inhibitor

    To attend, please RSVP no later than April 25 to Matthew Kuruc, PhD at ProFACT (E-mail, 732-230-3021)

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of ProFACT Proteomics, Inc. and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • April 28, 2011

    arrow-rightAn overview of REDCap: A free-web-based data-management & survey tool

    Time: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

    Location: 8th Floor Conf. Rm., Karp Building, Children's Hospital, 1 Blackfan Cir., Boston

    Come learn about Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap Survey, two free, secure, web-based applications designed to support data capture for research studies.

    Some key features of REDCap include:

    • Secure & web-based: Input data from anywhere in the world
    • Fully customizable: You are in total control of shaping your database or survey
    • Advanced question features: Auto-validation, branching logic and stop actions
    • Export collected data to common analysis packages: Excel, SPSS, SAS, STATA, R
    • Save your survey or forms as PDFs: Collect responses offline

    Christian Botte, a Harvard Catalyst electronic data capture (EDC) support specialist based at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will present a pair of information sessions at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Boston in February, March, and April on how to utilize the tools to build and manage online databases and surveys.

    Registration is required in order to attend either of these sessions. BIDMC faculty and staff can sign up by clicking here and CHB faculty and staff by clicking here; all others can register by contacting Christian Botte (E-mail, 617-754-8828).

  • April 29, 2011

    arrow-right“Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) for Primary Care Providers”

    Time: 08:30 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Sheraton Commander, 16 Garden St., Cambridge

    Are you a health care provider based in the community or a Harvard-affiliated investigator with an interest in engaging with the community in research? Then save the date for a one-day course sponsored by Harvard Catalyst’s Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) Initiative and Postgraduate Education in C/T Science Program to learn how to engage communities in research using the CBPR approach. The course will cover:

    • The CBPR approach & principles
    • The skills needed to engage partners in data analysis & dissemination
    • Your own role in the CBPR process
    • The policy implications of CBPR

    And much more.

    CME credits will be available for participating physicians.

    Click here to register for this course.  The registration deadline is April 22, 5pm. For more information, contact Jocelyn Chu, ScD, MPH (E-mail).