Events in March 2011

  • March 2, 2011

    arrow-right"The Long Tail of Global Health Equity: Tackling the Endemic NCDs of the Bottom Billion"

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

    Historically, non-communicable disease in middle-income countries has received close attention. It is crucial to turn attention to the disease burden of the poorest populations, the bottom billion, largely composed of children and young adults. Discussions at this meeting will contribute to the deliberations of a high-level and timely United Nations meeting in September about NCD health systems issues.

    The Harvard conference will include participants with expertise in conditions such as rheumatic heart disease, Burkitt’s lymphoma, malnutrition-associated diabetes, and the respiratory impact of household fuels as well as in global health financing, infectious disease, and mental health. Featured speakers will include Paul Farmer, Dean Jamison, K. Srinath Reddy, and Peter Hotez.

    This conference is co-hosted by Harvard Medical School, Partners In Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard School of Public Health, the NCD Alliance, and the Global Task Force on Expanded Access to Cancer Care & Control in Developing Countries.

    Registration is free. For more information about this conference (including updates to the agenda and the list of speakers), or to register, visit the conference website. Please direct all questions to the conference organizers (E-mail). Note that the conference will be streamed live for those who wish to see and hear the plenary presentations and discussions but cannot travel to Boston. General travel support is not available.

  • March 3, 2011

    arrow-right"The Long Tail of Global Health Equity: Tackling the Endemic NCDs of the Bottom Billion"

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

    Historically, non-communicable disease in middle-income countries has received close attention. It is crucial to turn attention to the disease burden of the poorest populations, the bottom billion, largely composed of children and young adults. Discussions at this meeting will contribute to the deliberations of a high-level and timely United Nations meeting in September about NCD health systems issues.

    The Harvard conference will include participants with expertise in conditions such as rheumatic heart disease, Burkitt’s lymphoma, malnutrition-associated diabetes, and the respiratory impact of household fuels as well as in global health financing, infectious disease, and mental health. Featured speakers will include Paul Farmer, Dean Jamison, K. Srinath Reddy, and Peter Hotez.

    This conference is co-hosted by Harvard Medical School, Partners In Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard School of Public Health, the NCD Alliance, and the Global Task Force on Expanded Access to Cancer Care & Control in Developing Countries.

    Registration is free. For more information about this conference (including updates to the agenda and the list of speakers), or to register, visit the conference website. Please direct all questions to the conference organizers (E-mail). Note that the conference will be streamed live for those who wish to see and hear the plenary presentations and discussions but cannot travel to Boston. General travel support is not available.

  • March 3, 2011

    arrow-rightHarvard University Center for AIDS Research (HU CFAR) Behavioral and Social Science Event

    Time: 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Fenway Health, 1340 Boyslton Street, Boston

    The Harvard University Center for AIDS Research (HU CFAR) Behavioral and Social Sciences Program cordially invites the Harvard research community to a seminar featuring the following presentations:

    “Infant Male Circumcision as Part of HIV Prevention Efforts in Botswana: Acceptability, Safety, and Sustainable Scale-Up”
    Rebeca Plank, MD
    Instructor in Medicine
    Harvard Medical School and Brigham & Women’s Hospital

    “Intervention Development for Stimulant Dependence and Risk Reduction in HIV Uninfected and Infected MSM”
    Matthew Mimiaga, ScD, MPH
    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
    Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital

    There will be opportunities for networking and for making research plans for the coming year.

    To register, visit the HU CFAR website.

  • March 3, 2011

    arrow-right“Open Access in Biomedical Leadership: The Time is Now”

    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Minot Rm., Countway Library, HMS, 10 Shattuck St., Boston

    Barbara Alving, MD
    Director, National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
    National Institutes of Health

    Barbara Alving, MD, is the director of the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), which funds the development of new technologies for basic and clinical research, supports training for re-searchers in the biomedical sciences, develops preclinical models, and provides health and biomedical education for the public. The NCRR is responsible for developing the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program (of which Harvard Catalyst is a member) that has evolved from the NIH Roadmap initiative to re-engineer clinical research.

    Please contact Veronica Meade-Kelly (E-mail, 617-432-4698) by February 28, 2011, to register to attend.

    Co-sponsored by the Consortium of Harvard Affiliated Offices for Faculty Development and Diversity, the Harvard Catalyst Program for Faculty Development and Diversity, and the HMS/HSDM Joint Committee on the Status of Women.

  • March 3, 2011

    arrow-rightMRI safety: Guidelines for safe MRI practice

    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

    Location: Rm 3.120, Simches Research Bldg, MGH, 185 Cambrdige Street, Boston

    Harvard Catalyst’s Translational Imaging Program, in collaboration with the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for Clinical Investigation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is sponsoring this three-lecture series designed to introduce clinical research coordinators, research nurses, and study staff to the basics of medical imaging and the principles of safe imaging practice. Attendees may choose to attend all three sessions or can attend whichever sessions are pertinent to their learning needs.

    • Learn the potential risks in the MRI environment
    • Learn the guidelines for safe MRI practice through real situation examples
    • Provide tools to answer patients/subjects questions about MRI procedures

    To learn more about these courses, and to register, visit the Imaging Program’s course page. Please note you must register for each session individually.

  • March 4, 2011

    arrow-rightBRI Musculoskeletal Research Center Imaging Workshop

    Time: 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Anestehsiology Conference Rm., CWNB-L1, BWH, 74 Francis St., Boston

    On March 4, 2011, the Musculoskeletal Research Center in Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Biomedical Research Institute will host a collaborative research workshop on imaging, featuring an introduction to BWH musculoskeletal imaging faculty and their research interests, imaging resources and facilities available to the community and current and future collaborative research opportunities. All researchers and clinicians are welcome to attend, and lunch will be served.

    Visit the BRI Musculoskeletal Research Center website for more information. To attend, please register with Anu Swaminathan (E-mail).

  • March 9, 2011

    arrow-rightIncarceration and Health Disparities Symposium

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Bornstein Amphitheater, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 45 Francis Street, Boston

    This symposium will bring together researchers, practitioners, and advocates to discuss current research on the role incarceration may play in promoting racial and/or ethnic disparities in healthcare and outcomes. Sessions during the symposium will cover:

    1. Current research on the impact of prior incarceration on mortality, cardiovascular health, infectious disease transmission, adolescent health and other disparities
    2. Interventions focused on improving outcomes surrounding incarceration
    3. Barriers to and facilitating factors in conducting research involving incarcerated populations

    A networking reception will follow.

    Co-sponsored by the Harvard Catalyst Health Disparities Research Program and the Center for Community Health and Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

    Click here to register for this free event. Please contact Kathryn Pollenz (E-mail) with questions.

  • March 10, 2011

    arrow-rightGetting started with Expression Analysis using JMP Genomics Workshop

    Time: 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Basic JMP Training. This will cover the basics of the JMP platform, including importing data, basic analytics and graphics. Users may attend just this portion if they have no interest in the second part.

    Basic expression analysis. The goal is to introduce the user with the basics of JMP Genomics and we will work through a case-study for expression analysis. This will cover import of data from various platforms, normalization, quality control analysis, ANOVA, and downstream pattern analysis.

    Click here to register.

  • March 11, 2011

    arrow-rightGetting Started with Basic Genetics Analysis in JMP Genomics Workshop

    Time: 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The goal of this workshop is to introduce the user with the basics of JMP Genomics and we will work through a case-study for genetic analysis. This will cover import of data from various platforms, quality control analysis, case-control analysis and quantitative trait analysis. There will be a break for lunch at 12 noon.  

    Click here to register.

     

  • March 11, 2011

    arrow-right3D Slicer for Quantitative Medical Imaging

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Rm. 403, Countway Library, HMS, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Translational Imaging Program invites all translational clinical scientists interested in medical image computing to a hands-on workshop on 3D Slicer, a free, open source software package for medical image visualization and analysis developed within the Harvard Catalyst community.

    This workshop, which will take place on February 18, 2011, and again on March 11, will provide members of the research community with a practical experience of the capabilities of the open source 3D Slicer software platform. The course is open to all members of institutions participating in Harvard Catalyst.

    For more detailed information on this workshop, visit the Imaging Courses page on the Harvard Catalyst

  • March 14, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • March 15, 2011

    arrow-rightITTM Module 1: Biomarkers and Imaging in Drug Development

    Location: Rm. 119, Maxwell Dworkin Hall, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    In a two-day curriculum, Biomarkers and Imaging in Drug Development, the first supplemental module to Harvard Catalyst's Intensive Training in Translational Medicine (ITTM) course, takes a more comprehensive look at biomarkers in T1 translational research.

    Applicants must be prior or current participants in any of the following Harvard Catalyst programs: ITTM, Introduction to Clinical Investigation, KL2 MeRIT, and Pilot Grants. Priority will be given to those who have completed the ITTM course.

    Click here for more information, or to apply.

  • March 15, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • March 15, 2011

    arrow-rightSingle and Multiplex Biomarker and Cell Based Assays Utilizing Multi-Array Technology

    Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Bray Rm., Harvard Institutes of Medicine, HMS, 4 Blackfan Cir., Boston

    On March 15th, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar and lab demonstration covering the MULTI-ARRAY technology developed by Meso Scale Discovery that enables the detection of biomarkers in single and multiplex formats.

    Seminar: Bray Room, 10:00am-11:00am

    Topics will include:

    1. Applications for translational research that measure cytokines and other biomarkers in clinical samples.
    2. Assay development and custom assays for Oncology and other discovery research applications.
    3. Novel Cell based assays and antibody screening techniques.
    4. Qualified kits for toxicology applications and developing assays for personalized medicine.

    Demonstration: HC-LITT, 11:00am-12:00pm

    The features of the Sector Imager 2400A and the Discovery Workbench Software will be demonstrated.

    This easy to use system is ideal for researchers seeking high information content, high sensitivity and high throughput.

    To attend, please register with Karma Carrier at Meso Scale Discovery (E-mail) or HC-LITT Director Winston Kuo (E-mail, 617-432-1894). All participants must also fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please send a copy of your completion certificate to Winston Kuo.

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of BioNanomatrix and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • March 16, 2011

    arrow-rightITTM Module 1: Biomarkers and Imaging in Drug Development

    Location: Rm. 119, Maxwell Dworkin Hall, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

    In a two-day curriculum, Biomarkers and Imaging in Drug Development, the first supplemental module to Harvard Catalyst's Intensive Training in Translational Medicine (ITTM) course, takes a more comprehensive look at biomarkers in T1 translational research.

    Applicants must be prior or current participants in any of the following Harvard Catalyst programs: ITTM, Introduction to Clinical Investigation, KL2 MeRIT, and Pilot Grants. Priority will be given to those who have completed the ITTM course.

    Click here for more information, or to apply.

  • March 16, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • March 16, 2011

    arrow-rightWelcome to the Genetic Code

    Time: 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Room 3.110, Simches Research Building, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    This introductory course will review fundamental language and concepts including DNA anatomy and genome organization; genotype-phenotype correlations; basic population genetics; and genotyping. Participants will have the opportunity to submit questions to the faculty prior to the lectures.

    Please click here to register. Please contact Suzanne Powell if you have any questions or concerns.

    This module is offered collaboratively by Harvard Catalyst, the Center for Clinical Investigation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    This course is part of a three module course series that covers both general and specialized topics in translational genetics, and which is designed to better acquaint clinicians and scientists with the tools and technologies of genetics and related fields. Participants are encouraged to sign up for the three courses in series. CME credits are available for all three courses.

  • March 16, 2011

    arrow-rightRadiation safety and radiation dose reduction

    Time: 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

    Location: Rm 3.120, Simches Research Bldg, MGH, 185 Cambrdige Street, Boston

    Harvard Catalyst’s Translational Imaging Program, in collaboration with the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for Clinical Investigation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is sponsoring this three-lecture series designed to introduce clinical research coordinators, research nurses, and study staff to the basics of medical imaging and the principles of safe imaging practice. Attendees may choose to attend all three sessions or can attend whichever sessions are pertinent to their learning needs.

    • Learn in the context of imaging the risks posed by different types of radiation emissions and radiation-emitting products
    • Understand how to support the benefits of medical imaging while minimizing the risks
    • Understand the radiation safety protocol screening forms and model consent risk statements

    To learn more about these courses, and to register, visit the Imaging Program’s course page. Please note you must register for each session individually.

  • March 16, 2011

    arrow-rightPre-survey evaluation seminar

    Time: 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Yawkey Center for Cancer Care, Yawkey 306 & 307, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston

    The Statistics and Survey Methods Core of the UMass Boston & Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center U54 Partnership, cordially invite the Harvard research community to a seminar titled, “Pre-survey evaluation: Evaluating questions with appraisals, cognitive interviews, pretests and behavior coding.”

    Presented by Dr. Floyd J. Fowler, PhD., this is the third session of their Population Research Seminar Series.

    Advance registration is required & seats are still available!  To sign up, click here.

  • March 17, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • March 17, 2011

    arrow-rightLeadership Strategies for the Researcher

    Location:

    Leadership Strategies for the Researcher (LSR), the first in the new Research Career Development Course series, is a two-day course designed to prepare clinical and translational investigators to confront the challenges of establishing a research program. The course – which will take place March 17-18, 2011 – is free of charge and is open to MDs and PhDs with the faculty rank of instructor or assistant professor who are currently funded through a K08, K23, or R01 grant, or who are nominated by their division chief.

    All applications and related endorsements for are due on January 28, 2011.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the LSR page or the Advanced Curriculum Compendium (ACC) on the Harvard Catalyst website.

    The Research Career Development Courses (RCDC) is a new series of courses developed by Harvard Catalyst’s Postgraduate Education in Clinical and Translational Science Program. The courses being offered through the RCDC focus on translational investigators’ development as researchers, including particular topics, tools, and techniques useful in advancing research careers.

  • March 18, 2011

    arrow-rightLeadership Strategies for the Researcher

    Location:

    Leadership Strategies for the Researcher (LSR), the first in the new Research Career Development Course series, is a two-day course designed to prepare clinical and translational investigators to confront the challenges of establishing a research program. The course – which will take place March 17-18, 2011 – is free of charge and is open to MDs and PhDs with the faculty rank of instructor or assistant professor who are currently funded through a K08, K23, or R01 grant, or who are nominated by their division chief.

    All applications and related endorsements for are due on January 28, 2011.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the LSR page or the Advanced Curriculum Compendium (ACC) on the Harvard Catalyst website.

    The Research Career Development Courses (RCDC) is a new series of courses developed by Harvard Catalyst’s Postgraduate Education in Clinical and Translational Science Program. The courses being offered through the RCDC focus on translational investigators’ development as researchers, including particular topics, tools, and techniques useful in advancing research careers.

  • March 18, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to Clinical Investigation

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education Program will start accepting applications tomorrow (December 10, 2010) for the March and May 2011 sessions of Introduction to Clinical Investigation (ICI), a five-day course designed to provide fellows and junior faculty at Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions with an intensive introduction to the principles and methods of clinical investigation. The course is free of charge and is open both to MDs and to PhDs with a clinical interest or whose work has a clinical focus.

    The March session will take place March 14-18, 2011, and the May session will take place May 9-13, 2011. Applicants will be able to indicate on their application which session they wish to attend.

    All applications and related endorsements for both sessions are due on January 21, 2011.

    This course offers an introduction to the skills necessary to embark on a career in clinical research. By providing a survey experience in core competency areas using a mixture of didactic lectures and workshops, attendees will be challenged to move beyond rote repetition of learned material. Participants will enhance their ability to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate data along the continuum of: T1 (proof of concept research), T2 (definitive clinical trials to change the standard of care), T3 (practice-based research), and T4 (population-based research).

    Upon completion, participants will receive a certificate of course participation designating them as Level I Harvard Catalyst Investigators.

    As some Harvard Catalyst-affiliated institutions (BWH, CHB, MGH) may already have similar introductory courses, department chairs or division chiefs will determine whether a particular individual would benefit from the curriculum described below.

    The course is directed by Elliott M. Antman, MD, and James Ware, PhD, director and associate director, respectively, of the Harvard Catalyst Postgraduate Education in Clinical/Translational Science Program.

    For more information, or to submit an application, visit the ICI page on the Harvard Catalyst website.

  • March 18, 2011

    arrow-rightImproved Western blotting: Rapid semi-dry transfer to a PVDF membrane

    Time: 09:00 AM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Bray Rm., Harvard Institutes of Medicine, HMS, 4 Blackfan Cir., Boston

    On March 18th, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar and lab demonstration covering technologies developed by Advanced Bioscience Technologies, LLC (ABT) for Western blotting of proteins via rapid semi-dry transfer of proteins to a PVDF membrane.

    Topics will include:

    • Discussion of membrane technology impact on Western blotting
    • Rapid transfer in semi-dry device format
    • Transfer efficiency – “blow through” reduction
    • Low auto-fluorescence PVDF membrane in Western blot quantitation
    • Rapid dot blot quantitation
    • Easy to use, reduced set up time consumable membrane

    The morning session will include a presentation on the impact of membrane technology developments on Western Blotting applications featuring data on transfer in semi-dry and tank formats. Quantitative Fluorescence imaging of Western blots will be presented. In the wet-lab workshop, we will have a semi-dry and tank transfer systems available for demonstrations and analyses of protein samples in the HC-LITT.  We encourage you to bring your own samples to run out on gels and Western blotted in the wet-lab. Please let us know ahead of the wet-lab so we can have the right SDS-PAGE gels available.

    To attend, please register with Malcolm G. Pluskal at ABT (E-mail) or HC-LITT Director Winston Kuo (E-mail). All participants must also fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please send a copy of your completion certificate to Winston Kuo.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of BioNanomatrix and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • March 18, 2011

    arrow-rightSystems for multiplex protein biomarker analysis

    Time: 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Bray Rm., Harvard Institutes of Medicine, HMS, 4 Blackfan Cir., Boston

    On March 18th, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar and lab demonstration covering technologies developed by Avantra Biosciences for multiplex protein biomarker analysis.

    Topics will include:

    • Overview of multiplex immunoassay protein array platform.
    • Demonstration of sample preparation to process protein array and analyze data (Hands on training using our special training BioChip)
    • Brainstorming sessions: What multiplex immunoassay panels would you like to see developed?

    To attend, please register with Elizabeth Holland at Avantra (E-mail, 617-892-7178) or HC-LITT Director Winston Kuo (E-mail, 617-432-1894). All participants must also fill out an HC-LITT support formand complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please send a copy of your completion certificate to Winston Kuo.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of BioNanomatrix and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • March 22, 2011

    arrow-rightExpression analysis using GenePattern

    Time: 09:30 AM - 3:30 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, Harvard Medical School, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    GenePattern is a powerful genomic analysis platform that provides access to more than 100 tools for gene expression analysis, proteomics, SNP analysis, and common data processing tasks. A web-based interface provides easy access to these tools and allows the creation of multi-step analysis workflows that enable reproducible in silico research. Through lectures and hands-on exercises, this workshop introduces GenePattern and the methods behind the GenePattern modules for gene expression analysis, including: running analyses using the GenePattern web interface, differential gene expression analysis, classification/prediction methods, clustering, and using pipelines to chain modules together to create and share methodologies.

    Offered by Harvard Catalyst, the HMS Center for Biomedical Informatics, and the Countway Library of Medicine – operating jointly as the C3 Bioinformatics Initiative. To register for this or any of the other courses being offered currently by the C3 Bioinformatics initiative, visit the C3 education website. Please note that you will need to have your Harvard University PIN or HMS eCommons ID in order to register for these courses.

  • March 23, 2011

    arrow-rightThe Cultural Competence in Research Symposium: AM session

    Time: 08:30 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Walter Amphitheater, TMEC, HMS, 260 Longwood Ave., Boston

    On March 23, 2011, Harvard Catalyst’s Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program, Research Subject Advocacy Program, Program for Faculty Development and Diversity, and Community Engagement Program, along with the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, will join the Bok Players in offering two half-day events focused on key topics in cultural competence in clinical and translational research and quality engagement and education of potential research participants. Through an interactive learning experience, the events will explore the complexities of issues such as engaging diverse communities in research, including obtaining consent from minority populations and encouraging minority accrual in clinical research

    These free interactive events will engage participants via the Bok Players – an interactive theatre group serving academia – whose performances will highlight some of the key principles of working with diverse communities in clinical and translational research, Following each performance, the Bok Players will facilitate an interactive discussion and Q&A session. These discussions will be supplemented by a panel of experts in areas such as community engagement, health disparities, human subject protection/research regulations, and research subject advocacy

    All faculty and study staff from institutions that participate in Harvard Catalyst are welcome to attend. Please register by March 21, 2011 to attend. Please indicate on the registration form whether you wish to attend the morning or afternoon event; both sessions present the same content and are offered in tandem to accommodate schedule and location restrictions. Please contact the Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program (E-mail) if you have any questions.

    This program meets the requirements of the Board of Registration in Nursing, at 244 CMR 5.00, for three contact hours of nursing continuing education.

  • March 23, 2011

    arrow-rightRisks and benefits of imaging

    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

    Location: Rm 4-002B, BWH, 1 Brigham Circle, Boston

    Harvard Catalyst’s Translational Imaging Program, in collaboration with the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for Clinical Investigation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is sponsoring this three-lecture series designed to introduce clinical research coordinators, research nurses, and study staff to the basics of medical imaging and the principles of safe imaging practice. Attendees may choose to attend all three sessions or can attend whichever sessions are pertinent to their learning needs.

    Objectives:

    • Understand the benefits of different imaging modalities (CT, MRI, PET, US)
    • Learn the risks of imaging contrast agents
    • Understand the potential risks of ionizing radiation

    To learn more about these courses, and to register, visit the Imaging Program’s course page. Please note you must register for each session individually.

  • March 23, 2011

    arrow-rightThe Cultural Competence in Research Symposium: PM session

    Time: 1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: O'Keefe Auditorium, MGH, 55 Fruit St., Boston

    On March 23, 2011, Harvard Catalyst’s Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program, Research Subject Advocacy Program, Program for Faculty Development and Diversity, and Community Engagement Program, along with the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital, will join the Bok Players in offering two half-day events focused on key topics in cultural competence in clinical and translational research and quality engagement and education of potential research participants. Through an interactive learning experience, the events will explore the complexities of issues such as engaging diverse communities in research, including obtaining consent from minority populations and encouraging minority accrual in clinical research

    These free interactive events will engage participants via the Bok Players – an interactive theatre group serving academia – whose performances will highlight some of the key principles of working with diverse communities in clinical and translational research, Following each performance, the Bok Players will facilitate an interactive discussion and Q&A session. These discussions will be supplemented by a panel of experts in areas such as community engagement, health disparities, human subject protection/research regulations, and research subject advocacy

    All faculty and study staff from institutions that participate in Harvard Catalyst are welcome to attend. Please register by March 16, 2011 to attend. Please indicate on the registration form whether you wish to attend the morning or afternoon event; both sessions present the same content and are offered in tandem to accommodate schedule and location restrictions. Please contact the Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program (E-mail) if you have any questions.

    This program meets the requirements of the Board of Registration in Nursing, at 244 CMR 5.00, for three contact hours of nursing continuing education.

  • March 24, 2011

    arrow-rightBRI Translational Genetics Seminar: David Beier, PhD, MD

    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Shapiro Board Room, Shapiro Cardiovascular Ctr., Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston

    Posted March 17, 2011

    Modeling Human Disease in the Mouse: Strategies and Resources

    David Beier, PhD, MD
    Professor, Department of Medicine, Brigham & Women’s Hospital

    The Center for Human Genetics in Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Biomedical Research Institute (BRI) continues its successful Translational Genetics Seminars with a talk by David Beier, PhD, MD on “Modeling Human Disease in the Mouse: Strategies and Resources”.

    CME credits available. Light dinner will be served. Please email Anu Swaminathan (E-mail) to register.

    The Translational Genetics Seminar Series brings together clinicians and geneticists with talks that emphasize the relevance of genetics in medicine.

  • March 28, 2011

    arrow-rightObesity Research to Inform Policymaking

    Time: 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Kresge 508, HSPH, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston

    Robin McKinnon, PhD, MPA
    Health Policy Specialist in the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch of the Applied Research Program, National Cancer Institute.  

    During this seminar, Dr. Robin McKinnon will focus on the different types of obesity research that critically inform policymaking at local, state and national levels within a social-ecological framework.  She will also discuss relevant resources and opportunities available at NCI/NIH for obesity policy research. 

    This event is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst’s Community Health Innovation and Research Program, Dana Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and the Harvard Prevention Research Center.

    A light lunch will be served.  For more information, contact Jennifer Opp (E-mail

  • March 28, 2011

    arrow-rightAn overview of REDCap: A free-web-based data-management & survey tool

    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

    Location: 8th Floor Conf. Rm., Karp Building, Children's Hospital, 1 Blackfan Cir., Boston

    Come learn about Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap Survey, two free, secure, web-based applications designed to support data capture for research studies.

    Some key features of REDCap include:

    • Secure & web-based: Input data from anywhere in the world
    • Fully customizable: You are in total control of shaping your database or survey
    • Advanced question features: Auto-validation, branching logic and stop actions
    • Export collected data to common analysis packages: Excel, SPSS, SAS, STATA, R
    • Save your survey or forms as PDFs: Collect responses offline

    Christian Botte, a Harvard Catalyst electronic data capture (EDC) support specialist based at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will present a pair of information sessions at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Boston in February, March, and April on how to utilize the tools to build and manage online databases and surveys.

    Registration is required in order to attend either of these sessions. BIDMC faculty and staff can sign up by clicking here and CHB faculty and staff by clicking here; all others can register by contacting Christian Botte (E-mail, 617-754-8828).

  • March 29, 2011

    arrow-right“Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) for Primary Care Providers”

    Time: 08:30 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Sheraton Commander, 16 Garden Street, Cambridge

    Are you a health care provider based in the community or a Harvard-affiliated investigator with an interest in engaging with the community in research? Then register for a one-day course sponsored by Harvard Catalyst’s Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) Initiative and Postgraduate Education in C/T Science Program to learn how to engage communities in research using the CBPR approach. The course will cover:

    • The CBPR approach & principles
    • The skills needed to engage partners in data analysis & dissemination
    • Your own role in the CBPR process
    • The policy implications of CBPR

    And much more.

    CME credits will be available for participating physicians.

    Click here to register for this course.  The registration deadline is April 22, 5pm. For more information, contact Jocelyn Chu, ScD, MPH (E-mail).

  • March 30, 2011

    arrow-rightOne-step Exosome Isolation and Amplification of Exosome RNAs for Biomarker Discovery

    Time: 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Bray Rm., Harvard Institutes of Medicine, HMS, 4 Blackfan Cir., Boston

    On March 30th, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar and workshop covering technologies developed by System Biosciences that focus on exosome isolation and amplification of exosome RNA for profiling and biomarker discovery.

    Topics will include:

    Exosome isolation from biofluids using ExoQuick
    Efficient amplification of RNA from exosomes, starting with as little as 250 µl of serum
    MicroRNA biomarker discovery from patient samples
    qPCR, Microarray, and Next-Gen Sequencing applications with amplified exosome RNA
    Hands-on training with the new SeraMir kit for exosome RNA profiling

    Registration is required for the workshop.  Inquire about bringing your own samples.

    Please RSVP before March 22 to either:

    Tosan Tutse-Tonwe, System Biosciences LLC, 301-335-8821/E-mail, or Winston Patrick Kuo, Director, HC-LITT, 617-432-1894/E-mail.

    All participants must also fill out an HC-LITT support form (PDF) and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please send a copy of your completion certificate to Winston Kuo.

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of BioNanomatrix and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

     

     

  • March 30, 2011

    arrow-rightThe Biostatistician's Role in Managing Clinical Translational Research Data

    Time: 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

    Location: Room 11081, CLSB Building, 11th Floor, DFCI, 3 Blackfan Circle, Boston

    Brad H. Pollock, M.P.H., Ph.D.

    Professor and Chairman, Henry B. Dielmann Distinguished University Chair
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
    School of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center

     

    Computation has played a pivotal role in modern biostatistical practice with a major emphasis on the development and application of new analytic methods.  Less computational attention has been focused on the data management component of biostatistics units.  Biomedical informatics has an increasingly prominent role in the clinical translational research enterprise, especially with the growth of the Clinical Translational Science Award program; however, interactions between biostatistics and those in computational disciplines have not been fully exploited. Clinical translational research is likely to be strengthened through synergistic interaction between biostatisticians, informaticians and information technology experts.

     

    Discussion Topics:

    1) Infrastructure and technologies

    2) Personnel responsibilities and oversight

    3) Human subjects and security considerations

    4) Opportunities to promote interactions between disciplines

     

    During this seminar, examples will be given of systems and projects that bring biostatistics together with other experts in order to optimize biostatistical core operations.

    Reception to follow.  Pre-registration is not required.  

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Biostatistics Program.

  • March 31, 2011

    arrow-rightMechanisms and Interventions in Childhood Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Time: 08:00 AM - 3:30 PM

    Location: Hyatt Regency, One Avenue de Lafayette Place, Boston

    The National Tay-Sachs & Allied Diseases Association is hosting a Science Symposium dedicated to addressing mechanisms and interventions in childhood neurodegeneration.  The goal of this meeting is to address cutting-edge issues affecting progress towards treatments in neurodegenerative diseases.  Key topics include immunology of storage diseases, neurodegenerative mechanisms, crossing  the blood brain barrier in lysosomal storage diseases, and gene therapy progress in neurological diseases. The panel discussion and other informal interactions will enable the cross-fertilization of ideas between academic and industry researchers.

    Click here to download flyer.   

    Please register by March 25, 2011.  To register, or for more information, please contact Ingrid Miller (E-mail, or call 617.277.4463).

  • March 31, 2011

    arrow-rightAn overview of REDCap: A free-web-based data-management & survey tool

    Time: 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

    Location: LMOB 7th Floor Conf. Rm., West Campus, BIDMC, 1 Deaconess Rd., Boston

    Come learn about Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap Survey, two free, secure, web-based applications designed to support data capture for research studies.

    Some key features of REDCap include:

    • Secure & web-based: Input data from anywhere in the world
    • Fully customizable: You are in total control of shaping your database or survey
    • Advanced question features: Auto-validation, branching logic and stop actions
    • Export collected data to common analysis packages: Excel, SPSS, SAS, STATA, R
    • Save your survey or forms as PDFs: Collect responses offline

    Christian Botte, a Harvard Catalyst electronic data capture (EDC) support specialist based at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will present a pair of information sessions at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Boston in February, March, and April on how to utilize the tools to build and manage online databases and surveys.

    Registration is required in order to attend either of these sessions. BIDMC faculty and staff can sign up by clicking here and CHB faculty and staff by clicking here; all others can register by contacting Christian Botte (E-mail, 617-754-8828).

  • March 31, 2011

    arrow-rightGenetic Literacy

    Time: 12:30 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Bornstein Amphitheatre, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 45 Francis Street, Boston

    What's a SNP? What's the HapMap? What is a microarray and is it used for genotyping or gene expression analysis? What's an association study (and why do they do it)? If you find yourself asking similar questions, come to this course designed to briefly describe the terminology, technologies, and methodologies of modern genetics.

    Please click here to register. Please contact Lisa Horton if you have any questions or concerns.

    This module is offered collaboratively by Harvard Catalyst, the Center for Clinical Investigation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    This course is part of a three module course series that covers both general and specialized topics in translational genetics, and which is designed to better acquaint clinicians and scientists with the tools and technologies of genetics and related fields. Participants are encouraged to sign up for the three courses in series. CME credits are available for all three courses.

  • March 31, 2011

    arrow-rightMetabolic & Cardiovascular Complications in HIV-infected Patients: Pathogenesis & Treatment in 2011

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Pechect Rm., Joseph B. Martin Conference Ctr., HMS, 77 Ave. Louis Pasteur, Boston

    The Harvard University Center for AIDS Research (HU CFAR) Clinical Core & Therapeutics Scientific Program cordially invites the Harvard research community to a seminar on metabolic and cardiovascular complications in HIV-infected patients. Download the event flyer for a list of speakers and topics.

    Please register by March 18, 2011. To register, or for more information, visit the HU CFAR website.

  • March 31, 2011

    arrow-rightIntegrative Genomics Viewer – Exploration of large integrated sequence and genomic datasets

    Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Researchers are collecting vast amounts of diverse genomic data with ever-increasing speed, but effective ways to visualize these data in an integrated manner have lagged behind the ability to generate them. To address this growing need, Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV), a novel and freely available visualization tool, helps users simultaneously integrate and analyze different types of genomic data, and gives them the flexibility to zoom in on a specific genomic region of interest or to pan out for a broad, whole genome view. The IGV is a high-performance visualization tool for interactive exploration of large, integrated datasets. It supports a wide variety of data types including sequence alignments, microarrays, and genomic annotations.

    Click here to register.

  • March 31, 2011

    arrow-rightDevelopment of Gene Therapy for Single Gene Disorders

    Time: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

    Location: TMEC Ampith., HMS, 260 Longwood, Boston

    Development of Gene Therapy for Single Gene Disorders

    On March 31th, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a symposium on the development and application of gene therapy for the treatment of single gene disorders. The presentation will focus on efforts to direct gene therapy to target sites including recent phase 2 clinical trial results aimed at treating genetic emphysema due to alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    Keynote Speaker: Terry Flotte, M.D. 
    Celia and Isaac Haidak Distinguished Professor
    Dean, Provost and Executive Deputy Chancellor University of Massachusetts Medical School

    To attend, click here to register.  

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of BioNanomatrix and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.