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Events in February 2011

  • February 1, 2011

    arrow-rightQuantitation of multiple protein markers in tissue sections with multispectral imaging & analysis

    Time: 09:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Bray Room, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston

    On February 1, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar and demonstration covering the application of multispectral imaging technologies developed by Cambridge Research & Instrumentation (CRI) and Caliper Life Sciences for quantification of protein expression, tissue segmentation, elimination of autofluorescence, and analysis of co-localized proteins within cellular compartments.

    To register, contact HC-LITT Director Winston Patrick Kuo (E-mail) or Ron Gulka at CRI (E-mail). All participants must fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please send a copy of your completion certificate to Winston Kuo.

  • February 1, 2011

    arrow-rightBIOBASE biological knowledge library for microarray and proteomic data

    Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The aim of this workshop is to give a basic and advanced introduction on gene expression data analyses performed with BIOBASE solutions. We will cover basic understanding and usage of the BIOBASE Knowledge Library; biomarker and drug target discovery; and pathway, gene regulation, and high throughput data analysis. Shorten your path to discovery with quality data and advanced analysis tools at your fingertips! Analyze data relevant to your research in a single platform for full genome coverage of human, mouse, and rat. The following modules are covered: TRANSFAC® gene regulation data, HumanPSDTM disease data, and TRANSPATH® signaling/metabolic pathway data.

    Click here to register.

  • February 1, 2011

    arrow-rightExPlain analysis system for microarray and proteomic data

    Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    This is an introductory workshop taking users through a basic workflow of the ExPlain system. Attendees will be guided through the many data analysis capabilities of ExPlain, with a focus on using these tools for hypothesis generation in the areas of transcriptional regulation and signal transduction networks. Who should attend? Researchers focusing on biological interpretation of microarray and proteomics data, who are not familiar with the ExPlain system, and need to: perform comprehensive promoter analysis, identify perturbed pathways, or predict key experimental regulators. Topics covered include: introduction to the interface basics, analysis types, data types in ExPlain, importing data, common analyses, and report generation.

    Click here to register.

  • February 7, 2011

    arrow-rightPerl and BioPerl for biologists

    Time: 09:30 AM - 4:30 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    This workshop gives an overview of Perl, with a quick introduction to Bioperl. Participants will learn to read and modify Perl scripts, as well as write small scripts of their own. Special focus is given to reading, filtering, and reformatting scientific data. Because the workshop lasts only one day, we do not have time to introduce the basic concepts of programming, such as loops, conditions, and variables. Anyone who has programmed even a small amount in any programming language should be comfortable, but others are encouraged to take a more extensive class. The examples are all biology-related, but biology training is not needed for the class.

    Click here to register.

  • February 8, 2011

    arrow-rightEnsembl Genome Browser Workshop

    Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, Harvard Medical School, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Ensemble provides unified access to genomic information and annotation for more than 50 eukaryotic species. Learn how to find what you need, from splice sites to regulatory regions to SNPs. We’ll also explore the BioMart tool to select and export Ensembl data. With hands-on exercises.

    Offered by Harvard Catalyst, the HMS Center for Biomedical Informatics, and the Countway Library of Medicine – operating jointly as the C3 Bioinformatics Initiative. To register for this or any of the other courses being offered currently by the C3 Bioinformatics initiative, visit the C3 education website. Please note that you will need to have your Harvard University PIN or HMS eCommons ID in order to register for these courses.

  • February 8, 2011

    arrow-rightThe 2011 Alvin F. Poussaint, MD Visiting Lecture

    Time: 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Rotunda Rm., Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, HMS, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

    “Achieving Health in the US: Lessons from the Civil Rights Movement”

    Paula Johnson, MD, MPH
    Chief, Division of Women’s Health and Executive Director, Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
    Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

    Tuesday, February 8, 2011, 3:00pm – 4:00pm
    Rotunda Room
    Joseph B. Martin Conference Center
    Harvard Medical School
    77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

    A reception will follow.

    The Alvin F. Poussaint, MD Visiting Lecture Fund at Harvard Medical School was established with an inaugural gift from Harvard Medical School alumni/ae in honor of Dr. Poussaint. The purpose of the Fund is to provide an annual lecture at HMS and a forum for connecting Harvard Medical School alumni/ae leaders in medicine and science with youth (e.g., pre-college students from the Boston area, college students, HMS medical students, and HSDM students), residents, fellows, and faculty of HMS and HMS-affiliated institutions. Invited lecturers will be underrepresented minority alumni/ae of HMS and/or of the programs of its teaching hospitals and research institutions.

    Sponsored by the Harvard Medical School Office for Diversity and Community Partnership. To attend this lecture, RSVP by February 2, 2011, to Veronica Meade-Kelly (E-mail, 617-432-2313).

  • February 9, 2011

    arrow-rightHigh-throughput microarray analysis in a cluster environment

    Time: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Computers running large dataset in R can sometimes encounter problems with memory, which can be a very frustrating experience. The workshop will cover on how to carryout microarray analysis in a high performance cluster environment including how to install R and Bioconductor libraries in the cluster environment. Running a R job both interactively and remotely to retrieve the desired results will also be taught. Students will learn how to carry out the following: quality control, normalization, filtering, statistical analysis, differential expression using limma, and clustering analysis of Affymetrix data. Please note: You will need a login account for the HMS Orchestra cluster to carry out the hands-on exercises. Visit this link to obtain an account.

    Click here to register.

  • February 9, 2011

    arrow-rightBRI Obesity Research Incubator Session

    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Shapiro Breakout Room, Shapiro Cardiovascular Center, BWH, 70 Francis Street, Boston

    The Cardiovascular, Diabetes & Metabolic Diseases (CVDM) Research Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Biomedical Research Institute (BRI) hopes to catalyze the advancement of obesity-related research activities by:

    • Bringing together clinicians and researchers whose work and/or interests relate to the field of obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, and
    • Promoting cross-collaborative research efforts and thereby accelerate the process of eliminating this enormous public health and economic burden to the United States

    To that end, the CVDM Research Center cordially invites you to participate in its kick-off incubator session on obesity and associated cormorbidities. All members of the Harvard research and clinical communities with an interest in coming together to exchange ideas and launch cross-collaborative research efforts in the field of obesity and obesity-related comorbidities are welcome to attend. This event will also feature an interactive poster session on obesity-related research that will focus on early stage ideas and novel hypotheses.

    To find out more, visit the event website.

  • February 10, 2011

    arrow-rightHSPH Bioinformatics Core Forum: Mark Boguski, MD, PhD

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Kresge 3, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston

    “Health Communication at the Nexus of Social Media and Popular Culture”

    Mark Boguski, MD, PhD
    Associate Professor
    Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBMI)
    Harvard Medical School

    Today’s research increasingly utilizes high dimensional data, requiring development of new analytical approaches that drive a relationship between biology and information sciences. Bioinformatics embraces this interface to generate testable hypotheses and yield discovery from complex data driven by biological insight to result in an impact on health. Every month, the HSPH Bioinformatics Core (led by Harvard Catalyst Translational Genetics & Bioinformatics Consultant Winston Hide, PhD) hosts leading quantitative scientists who show how they develop and use computational methods in transcriptomics, epigenetics, genetic variation, and population-level genomics to impact on health. Learn more about the forum on the Core website.

  • February 10, 2011

    arrow-right“Are you writing a K? Get practical advice”

    Time: 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    Location: Minot Room, Countway Library, HMS, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Are you writing a K grant? Then come to a panel discussion hosted by Ingrid Bassett, MD; Kenneth Freedberg, MD; and Rochelle Walensky, MD, to hear general advice and guidance applicable to anyone from any discipline who is planning or writing a K award application. In addition, an NIH officer will be available to take specific questions from attendees.

    Refreshments will be provided. Co-sponsored by the Harvard University Center for AIDS Research (HU CFAR). To attend, RSVP to Ingrid Bassett (E-mail) by January 30, 2011.

  • February 15, 2011

    arrow-rightSingle molecule-level analysis of genome structural variation and DNA damage

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Bray Room, Harvard Insitutes of Medicine, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston

    On February 15th, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar and lab demonstration covering technologies for high-resolution, multi-color imaging and single-molecule analysis of DNA developed by BioNanomatrix (BNM).

    Although, we’re now in an era where one can readily sequence DNA and determine single nucleotide variation, information on the higher-level structure of “completed” genomes is lacking, while structural variations (such as deletions, duplications, and translocations) have been implicated in many genetic diseases and cancers.

    Seminar: 1:00pm – 2:30 pm

    Topics will include:

    • Labeling and imaging of unamplified, linearized DNA fragments up to >1Mb in length
    • Initial data supporting studies of structural variation and the assessment of DNA damage

    Demonstration: 3:00 – 5:00 pm

    A high-resolution, multi-color imaging and single-molecule DNA analysis system will be   demonstrated for use in whole genome analysis and structural variation studies and to assay DNA damage.

    Space is limited to 10 seats for the demonstration. To attend, please register with Sharon Pritchett at BNM (E-mail) by February 1, 2011. All participants must also fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please send a copy of your completion certificate to Winston Kuo (E-mail).

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of BioNanomatrix and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • February 15, 2011

    arrow-rightRapid imaging and analysis of kilobase to megabase size DNA using disposable chips

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Bray Room, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, HMS, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston

    On February 15th, the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a seminar and lab demonstration covering technologies for high-resolution, multi-color imaging and single-molecule analysis of DNA developed by BioNanomatrix (BNM).

    Although, we’re now in an era where one can readily sequence DNA and determine single nucleotide variation, information on the higher-level structure of “completed” genomes is lacking, while structural variations (such as deletions, duplications, and translocations) have been implicated in many genetic diseases and cancers.

    Seminar: 1:00pm – 2:30 pm

    Topics will include:

    • Labeling and imaging of unamplified, linearized DNA fragments up to >1Mb in length
    • Initial data supporting studies of structural variation and the assessment of DNA damage

    Demonstration: 3:00 – 5:00 pm

    A high-resolution, multi-color imaging and single-molecule DNA analysis system will be   demonstrated for use in whole genome analysis and structural variation studies and to assay DNA damage.

    Space is limited to 10 seats for the demonstration. To attend, please register with Sharon Pritchett at BNM (E-mail) by February 1, 2011. All participants must also fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please send a copy of your completion certificate to Winston Kuo (E-mail).

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Hosted by the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL). Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of BioNanomatrix and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • February 15, 2011

    arrow-rightThe Ragon Symposium: “Clinical Advances in HIV Prevention: Vaccines, Microbicides, and PrEP”

    Time: 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Rotunda Room, Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

    Topics to be covered:

    • HIV Vaccine Trials: Perspectives on the Fiend
    • The Thai Phase III Vaccine Trial: Scientific Progress and Next Steps
    • Antiretroviral Chemoprophylaxis: New Opportunities and New Questions
    • Panel Discussion: Integration of HIV Prevention Clinical Research

    Jointly sponsored by the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard; and the Harvard University Center for AIDS Research (HU CFAR).

    For more information, contact the Ragon Institute (E-mail). To register for this event, visit the HU CFAR website.

  • February 17, 2011

    arrow-rightHarvard Catalyst Geriatric Depression Working Group LaUNCH

    Location: Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston

    Do you have an interest in the area of late-life depression? If so, please consider joining the Harvard Catalyst Geriatric Depression Working Group. The Working Group aims to address gaps in research in geriatric depression at Harvard Medical School and its affiliated institutions by forming collaborations; generating project ideas; preparing research grants; and mentoring junior faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and students. This effort will be spearheaded by Olivia Okereke, MD, MS, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital; and Frances M. Yang, PhD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Hebrew SeniorLife.

    The Working Group will focus on four different research tracks:

    1. Biomarkers and emerging translational tools
    2. Measurement, including refinements for diverse populations
    3. Comorbid illnesses and management
    4. Prevention and intervention strategies

    The Working Group will meet monthly to discuss and present on the research progress of each track. Researchers working on each track will also meet together annually to present their progress to the entire group.

    The Harvard Catalyst Working Group will debut with the LaUNCH, a full-day workshop held on February 17, 2011 at the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine. This meeting will establish the Working Group’s goals within the four focus tracks. The LaUNCH will include presentations by numerous distinguished Harvard Medical School investigators and guest speakers:

    • Margarita Alegría, PhD
      Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
      Director, Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research, Cambridge Health Alliance
    • Maurizio Fava, MD
      Slater Family Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
      Vice Chair, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital
      Director, MGH Depression Clinical and Research Program
    • Joseph J. Gallo, MD, MPH
      Professor of Family Medicine and Community Health; Senior Scholar, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
    • Richard N. Jones, ScD
      Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
      Department of Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      Division of Gerontology, and Director of Mental Health and Aging, Institute for Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife
    • Charles F. Reynolds III, MD
      UPMC Professor of Geriatric Psychiatry; Professor of psychiatry, neurology and neuroscience; Senior Associate Dean, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
      Director, Aging Institute of UPMC Senior Services and the University of Pittsburgh
      Director, Advanced Center for Interventions and Services Research in Late-Life Mood Disorders and the John A. Hartford Center of Excellence in Geriatric Psychiatry
    • David A. Silbersweig, MD
      Stanley Cobb Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
      Chair, Department of Psychiatry and Institute for the Neurosciences, Brigham and Women’s/Faulkner Hospitals

    In addition to launching the Working Group, the LaUNCH will serve as a launching point for producing a series of articles for prominent journals and conferences in the field.

    Click here for registration information. Register by December 20, 2010.

  • February 18, 2011

    arrow-right3D Slicer for Quantitative Medical Imaging

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Rm. 403, Countway Library, HMS, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Translational Imaging Program invites all translational clinical scientists interested in medical image computing to a hands-on workshop on 3D Slicer, a free, open source software package for medical image visualization and analysis developed within the Harvard Catalyst community.

    This workshop, which will take place on February 18, 2011, and again on March 11, will provide members of the research community with a practical experience of the capabilities of the open source 3D Slicer software platform. The course is open to all members of institutions participating in Harvard Catalyst.

    For more detailed information on this workshop, visit the Imaging Courses page on the Harvard Catalyst

  • February 22, 2011

    arrow-rightWorking Lunch on Wound Healing

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location:

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators are hosting an informal discussion about research in wound healing. Over lunch with other members of the Harvard community, participants will have the opportunity to talk about their research, brainstorm, exchange information about resources, and network.

    This event will take place February 22, 2011, at 12:00 noon in the Longwood Medical Area. Attendance is limited and registration is required. To register, please send your contact information, home department, and institution, along with a brief description of your research interests as they relate to wound healing to Amy Webber (E-mail, 617-432-7810).

  • February 28, 2011

    arrow-rightAn overview of REDCap: A free-web-based data-management & survey tool

    Time: 09:30 AM - 11:00 AM

    Location: Trustman Boardroom, East Campus, BIDMC, 330 Longwood Ave., Boston

    Come learn about Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap Survey, two free, secure, web-based applications designed to support data capture for research studies.

    Some key features of REDCap include:

    • Secure & web-based: Input data from anywhere in the world
    • Fully customizable: You are in total control of shaping your database or survey
    • Advanced question features: Auto-validation, branching logic and stop actions
    • Export collected data to common analysis packages: Excel, SPSS, SAS, STATA, R
    • Save your survey or forms as PDFs: Collect responses offline

    Christian Botte, a Harvard Catalyst electronic data capture (EDC) support specialist based at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will present a pair of information sessions at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Children’s Hospital Boston in February, March, and April on how to utilize the tools to build and manage online databases and surveys.

    Registration is required in order to attend either of these sessions. BIDMC faculty and staff can sign up by clicking here and CHB faculty and staff by clicking here; all others can register by contacting Christian Botte (E-mail, 617-754-8828).

  • February 28, 2011

    arrow-rightA Workshop on Imaging Technologies for Small Animal Studies

    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Minot Rm., Countway Library, HMS, 10 Shattuck St., Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators and the Harvard Catalyst Translational Imaging Program cordially invite investigators interested in learning about small animal imaging to a workshop on Monday, February 28, 2011 at 4:00pm. We welcome researchers at all stages of their research and careers.

    This two hour session will feature an overview of technologies available for imaging small animals. Speakers will include members of imaging cores who will talk about facilities and resources; various modalities including MRI and PET will be covered. In addition, an investigator from the Harvard community will discuss their use of cutting edge technologies for in vivo imaging. The event will close with an opportunity for smaller group or one-on-one discussions, in order for participants to learn more about the particular resources available to them.

    Attendance at this event is limited to 25 individuals, and registration is required. Attendees should RSVP by February 21, 2011. Please send your name, contact information, home department and institution, and a brief description of your research interests as they relate to this topic to Amy Webber (E-mail; 617-432-7810). We will include this information in a list of attendees that will be circulated at the event.