Events in January 2012

  • January 9, 2012

    arrow-rightMedical Imaging: Seeing What Makes You Sick

    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Allen Room, (Building 36, Room 462), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

    Imaging technologies (MRI, PET, CT, ultrasound, optical) are the cornerstones of medical practice. We will explore how they make physical properties of human tissues visible, highlighting current capabilities, limitations and the future potential of improvements to the technology. We will delve deeply into a physiological process such as angiogenesis and show how it is disrupted by disease focusing on how visualization through different imaging modalities has both advanced our understanding of the biology and contributed to improvements in healthcare. Sessions will focus on a specific example of how one imaging modality is used in the treatment of a cancer, or a neuropsychiatric, pulmonary or cardiovascular disorder. Each session will be led by a unique trio of experienced faculty members (an HMS affiliated clinical translational investigator using an imaging modality in their work, a hosting/collaborating MIT professor who has contributed to the development of that technology and a discussant who has sufficient knowledge and interest in the topic to generate a lively discussion.

    Presenters include: Randy Gollub (Course Instructor), Bruce Rosen, Georges El Fakhri, Steve Hyman, Jacob Hooker, Jeff Yap, Collin Stultz, José Venegas, Samuel Patz, David Sosnovik, Ron Blankstein, John Chen, David Alsop, Gottfried Schlaug, Scott Harris and others to be announced.

    Please note that enrollment is limited to 30 participants.


    Though this course has multiple sessions, participants are encouraged to attend the 1/9 session to gain the most from this course. Participants welcome at individual sessions.

    To register for the course, please contact Joseph R. Stein (E-Mail , 617-452-4091)

    This course is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst and Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium. For more information, please visit the course website: http://mvisionconsortium.mit.edu/minicourse-medicalImaging

  • January 10, 2012

    arrow-rightMedical Imaging: Seeing What Makes You Sick

    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Allen Room, (Building 36, Room 462), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

    Imaging technologies (MRI, PET, CT, ultrasound, optical) are the cornerstones of medical practice. We will explore how they make physical properties of human tissues visible, highlighting current capabilities, limitations and the future potential of improvements to the technology. We will delve deeply into a physiological process such as angiogenesis and show how it is disrupted by disease focusing on how visualization through different imaging modalities has both advanced our understanding of the biology and contributed to improvements in healthcare. Sessions will focus on a specific example of how one imaging modality is used in the treatment of a cancer, or a neuropsychiatric, pulmonary or cardiovascular disorder. Each session will be led by a unique trio of experienced faculty members (an HMS affiliated clinical translational investigator using an imaging modality in their work, a hosting/collaborating MIT professor who has contributed to the development of that technology and a discussant who has sufficient knowledge and interest in the topic to generate a lively discussion.

    Presenters include: Randy Gollub (Course Instructor), Bruce Rosen, Georges El Fakhri, Steve Hyman, Jacob Hooker, Jeff Yap, Collin Stultz, José Venegas, Samuel Patz, David Sosnovik, Ron Blankstein, John Chen, David Alsop, Gottfried Schlaug, Scott Harris and others to be announced.

    Please note that enrollment is limited to 30 participants.


    Though this course has multiple sessions, participants are encouraged to attend the 1/9 session to gain the most from this course. Participants welcome at individual sessions.

    To register for the course, please contact Joseph R. Stein (E-Mail , 617-452-4091)

    This course is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst and Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium. For more information, please visit the course website: http://mvisionconsortium.mit.edu/minicourse-medicalImaging

  • January 10, 2012

    arrow-rightInnovation Grand Rounds

    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Shapiro Breakout Room, 70 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115

    The Brigham and Women’s Hospital Biomedical Research Institute (BRI) is launching a new Innovation Grand Rounds to promote broad perspective dialogue on opportunities and approaches relevant to innovation at BWH, provide tutorials/workshops on practical matters in medical innovation and build a community of clinicians and scientists interested in translatable technologies and health care innovation.

    The kick-off session on Tuesday, January 10, will feature William Chin, MD, Harvard Medical School Executive Dean for Research and Lee M. Nadler, MD, Harvard Medical School Dean for Clinical & Translational Research and Director of Harvard Catalyst. All are welcome, but registration is required.

    For more information, and to register, please visit the Innovation Grand Rounds website:
    http://www.brighamandwomens.org/research/centers/innovation/grand_rounds.aspx?sub=0

  • January 11, 2012

    arrow-rightPrinciples and Challenges for Ethical Biostatistical Practice

    Time: 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Carrie Hall, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 15 Francis Street, Boston, MA, 02115

    Speakers:

    Shelley Hurwitz, PhD
    Director of Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Investigation, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
    Assistant Professor (Biostatistics), Harvard Medical School
    Chair, American Statistical Association Committee on Professional Ethics

    Jonathan Gelfond, MD PhD
    Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics
    University of Texas health Science Center at San Antonio

    Peter Imrey, PhD
    Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University
    Past President, International Biometric Society Eastern North American Region
    Member, American Statistical Association Committee on Professional Ethics

    In this Harvard Catalyst Biostatistics Seminar, three panelists and the audience will interactively explore ethical issues in biostatistical practice.  Dr. Hurwitz will introduce the topic and present the historical context of ethics in statistical practice. Dr. Gelfond will review ethical principles recently proposed specifically to guide data analysis by clinical and translational researchers (Stat Med. 2011, 30:2785-92), with examples that will ring true for many biostatisticians.  Dr. Imrey will add examples and comment, from a systems perspective, on 21st century medical research integrity concerns and the statistical professions responses to medical society reform efforts. He will also moderate audience discussion, including comments, questions, suggestions, and objections.

  • January 17, 2012

    arrow-rightMedical Imaging: Seeing What Makes You Sick

    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Allen Room, (Building 36, Room 462), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

    Speaker: Randy L. Gollub "Frontiers in Brain Imaging"

    Imaging technologies (MRI, PET, CT, ultrasound, optical) are the cornerstones of medical practice. We will explore how they make physical properties of human tissues visible, highlighting current capabilities, limitations and the future potential of improvements to the technology. We will delve deeply into a physiological process such as angiogenesis and show how it is disrupted by disease focusing on how visualization through different imaging modalities has both advanced our understanding of the biology and contributed to improvements in healthcare. Sessions will focus on a specific example of how one imaging modality is used in the treatment of a cancer, or a neuropsychiatric, pulmonary or cardiovascular disorder. Each session will be led by a unique trio of experienced faculty members (an HMS affiliated clinical translational investigator using an imaging modality in their work, a hosting/collaborating MIT professor who has contributed to the development of that technology and a discussant who has sufficient knowledge and interest in the topic to generate a lively discussion.

    Presenters include: Randy Gollub (Course Instructor), Bruce Rosen, Georges El Fakhri, Steve Hyman, Jacob Hooker, Jeff Yap, Collin Stultz, José Venegas, Samuel Patz, David Sosnovik, Ron Blankstein, John Chen, David Alsop, Gottfried Schlaug, Scott Harris and others to be announced.

    Please note that enrollment is limited to 30 participants.


    Though this course has multiple sessions, participants are encouraged to attend the 1/9 session to gain the most from this course. Participants welcome at individual sessions.

    To register for the course, please contact Joseph R. Stein (E-Mail , 617-452-4091)

    To join this class via webex, click here

    This course is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst and Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium. For more information, please visit the course website: http://mvisionconsortium.mit.edu/minicourse-medicalImaging

  • January 19, 2012

    arrow-rightProtein synthesis and degradation in mycobacteria: lost in mistranslation

    Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

    Location: Seminar Room A, 245 First Street, 17th Floor, Cambridge, MA, 02142

    Speaker:   Eric J. Rubin, MD, PhD

                    Department of Immunology and

        Infectious Diseases

        Harvard School of Public Health

    Summary:  All cellular functions rely on an adequate fidelity of protein translation and as such, multiple mechanisms exist to ensure accurate translation.  Recent evidence has emerged, however, that errors in protein translation (mistranslation) occur at much higher frequencies than previously appreciated.  It is not clear, however, whether cells merely tolerate translational errors or if they have evolved to take advantage of mistranslation to adapt to stressful environments.  Here, we show that mycobacteria engineered to misincorporate glutamate and aspartate have thousands-fold more tolerance to the antibiotic rifampicin.  Furthermore, substantial rates of mistranslation occur physiologically in response to environmental stress.  We propose that specific amino acid mistranslation may be a source for adaptive proteomic diversity for microbial populations.

     

    For more information, contact Pam Quattrocchi (email, 617-892-8604)

  • January 23, 2012

    arrow-rightMedical Imaging: Seeing What Makes You Sick

    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Allen Room, (Building 36, Room 462), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

    Session Topic: Cardiovascular imaging with PET and MR

    Imaging technologies (MRI, PET, CT, ultrasound, optical) are the cornerstones of medical practice. We will explore how they make physical properties of human tissues visible, highlighting current capabilities, limitations and the future potential of improvements to the technology. We will delve deeply into a physiological process such as angiogenesis and show how it is disrupted by disease focusing on how visualization through different imaging modalities has both advanced our understanding of the biology and contributed to improvements in healthcare. Sessions will focus on a specific example of how one imaging modality is used in the treatment of a cancer, or a neuropsychiatric, pulmonary or cardiovascular disorder. Each session will be led by a unique trio of experienced faculty members (an HMS affiliated clinical translational investigator using an imaging modality in their work, a hosting/collaborating MIT professor who has contributed to the development of that technology and a discussant who has sufficient knowledge and interest in the topic to generate a lively discussion.

    Presenters include: Randy Gollub (Course Instructor), Bruce Rosen, Georges El Fakhri, Steve Hyman, Jacob Hooker, Jeff Yap, Collin Stultz, José Venegas, Samuel Patz, David Sosnovik, Ron Blankstein, John Chen, David Alsop, Gottfried Schlaug, Scott Harris and others to be announced.

    Please note that enrollment is limited to 30 participants.


    Though this course has multiple sessions, participants are encouraged to attend the 1/9 session to gain the most from this course. Participants welcome at individual sessions.

    To register for the course, please contact Joseph R. Stein (E-Mail , 617-452-4091)

    Click here to join this class via webex.

    This course is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst and Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium. For more information, please visit the course website: http://mvisionconsortium.mit.edu/minicourse-medicalImaging

  • January 24, 2012

    arrow-rightMedical Imaging: Seeing What Makes You Sick

    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Allen Room, (Building 36, Room 462), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

    Session topic: MRI physics techiniques to characterize brain tissue function

    Imaging technologies (MRI, PET, CT, ultrasound, optical) are the cornerstones of medical practice. We will explore how they make physical properties of human tissues visible, highlighting current capabilities, limitations and the future potential of improvements to the technology. We will delve deeply into a physiological process such as angiogenesis and show how it is disrupted by disease focusing on how visualization through different imaging modalities has both advanced our understanding of the biology and contributed to improvements in healthcare. Sessions will focus on a specific example of how one imaging modality is used in the treatment of a cancer, or a neuropsychiatric, pulmonary or cardiovascular disorder. Each session will be led by a unique trio of experienced faculty members (an HMS affiliated clinical translational investigator using an imaging modality in their work, a hosting/collaborating MIT professor who has contributed to the development of that technology and a discussant who has sufficient knowledge and interest in the topic to generate a lively discussion.

    Presenters include: Randy Gollub (Course Instructor), Bruce Rosen, Georges El Fakhri, Steve Hyman, Jacob Hooker, Jeff Yap, Collin Stultz, José Venegas, Samuel Patz, David Sosnovik, Ron Blankstein, John Chen, David Alsop, Gottfried Schlaug, Scott Harris and others to be announced.

    Please note that enrollment is limited to 30 participants.


    Though this course has multiple sessions, participants are encouraged to attend the 1/9 session to gain the most from this course. Participants welcome at individual sessions.

    To register for the course, please contact Joseph R. Stein (E-Mail , 617-452-4091)

    To join this class via webex, click here.

    This course is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst and Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium. For more information, please visit the course website: http://mvisionconsortium.mit.edu/minicourse-medicalImaging

  • January 25, 2012

    arrow-rightHC-LITT/HCCL Wet Lab Workshop

    Time: 08:00 AM - 12:30 PM

    Location: Harvard Medical School, HIM #144, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115

    Automated Genomic Sample Preparation Solution using Digital Microfluidics

    On January 25 and 26 the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a hands-on workshop covering the practical application of digital microfluidics to enable a flexible automation solution for genomic sample preparation.  Participants will work with DNA or cDNA samples to construct  NGS sequencing libraries for the Illumina® sequencing  platforms using  the Mondrian™ SP  digital microfluidic device. 

    This workshop will combine practical in-lab experience with one of NuGEN’s library methods and the Mondrian SP System, along with classroom presentations reviewing the digital microfluidic technology and exploring a variety of NGS sample preparation workflows that can help to eliminate the bottlenecks often encountered with sequencing library preparation.  

    Registration is required, and space is limited to 4 participants per session. To register, contact Anne Smith at NuGEN Technologies (E-mail). Please register prior to Jan 16th.

    All participants must fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please provide HC-LITT Director Winston Patrick Kuo (E-mail) with a copy of your completion certificate.

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of NuGEN Technologies and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • January 25, 2012

    arrow-rightHC-LITT/HCCL Wet Lab Workshop

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Harvard Medical School, HIM #144, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115

    Automated Genomic Sample Preparation Solution using Digital Microfluidics

    On January 25 and 26 the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a hands-on workshop covering the practical application of digital microfluidics to enable a flexible automation solution for genomic sample preparation.  Participants will work with DNA or cDNA samples to construct  NGS sequencing libraries for the Illumina® sequencing  platforms using  the Mondrian™ SP  digital microfluidic device. 

    This workshop will combine practical in-lab experience with one of NuGEN’s library methods and the Mondrian SP System, along with classroom presentations reviewing the digital microfluidic technology and exploring a variety of NGS sample preparation workflows that can help to eliminate the bottlenecks often encountered with sequencing library preparation.  

    Registration is required, and space is limited to 4 participants per session. To register, contact Anne Smith at NuGEN Technologies (E-mail). Please register prior to Jan 16th.

    All participants must fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please provide HC-LITT Director Winston Patrick Kuo (E-mail) with a copy of your completion certificate.

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of NuGEN Technologies and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • January 26, 2012

    arrow-rightHC-LITT/HCCL Wet Lab Workshop

    Time: 08:00 AM - 12:30 PM

    Location: Harvard Medical School, HIM #144, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115

    Automated Genomic Sample Preparation Solution using Digital Microfluidics

    On January 25 and 26 the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a hands-on workshop covering the practical application of digital microfluidics to enable a flexible automation solution for genomic sample preparation.  Participants will work with DNA or cDNA samples to construct  NGS sequencing libraries for the Illumina® sequencing  platforms using  the Mondrian™ SP  digital microfluidic device. 

    This workshop will combine practical in-lab experience with one of NuGEN’s library methods and the Mondrian SP System, along with classroom presentations reviewing the digital microfluidic technology and exploring a variety of NGS sample preparation workflows that can help to eliminate the bottlenecks often encountered with sequencing library preparation.  

    Registration is required, and space is limited to 4 participants per session. To register, contact Anne Smith at NuGEN Technologies (E-mail). Please register prior to Jan 16th.

    All participants must fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please provide HC-LITT Director Winston Patrick Kuo (E-mail) with a copy of your completion certificate.

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of NuGEN Technologies and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • January 26, 2012

    arrow-rightHC-LITT/HCCL Wet Lab Workshop

    Time: 1:00 PM - 5:30 PM

    Location: Harvard Medical School, HIM #144, 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, MA 02115

    Automated Genomic Sample Preparation Solution using Digital Microfluidics

    On January 25 and 26 the Harvard Catalyst Laboratory for Innovative Translational Technologies (HC-LITT) and the Harvard Catalyst Central Laboratory (HCCL) will host a hands-on workshop covering the practical application of digital microfluidics to enable a flexible automation solution for genomic sample preparation.  Participants will work with DNA or cDNA samples to construct  NGS sequencing libraries for the Illumina® sequencing  platforms using  the Mondrian™ SP  digital microfluidic device. 

    This workshop will combine practical in-lab experience with one of NuGEN’s library methods and the Mondrian SP System, along with classroom presentations reviewing the digital microfluidic technology and exploring a variety of NGS sample preparation workflows that can help to eliminate the bottlenecks often encountered with sequencing library preparation.  

    Registration is required, and space is limited to 4 participants per session. To register, contact Anne Smith at NuGEN Technologies (E-mail). Please register prior to Jan 16th.

    All participants must fill out an HC-LITT support form and complete an online Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S) training. If you have previously completed the EH&S training, please provide HC-LITT Director Winston Patrick Kuo (E-mail) with a copy of your completion certificate.

    The mission of HC-LITT is to provide the Harvard research community with early access to enabling leading-edge genomic and proteomic technologies. The mission of HCCL is to perform specialty tests in a CLIA-certified central laboratory at low cost and high consistent quality.

    Harvard University, HC-LITT, HCCL, and Harvard Catalyst do not endorse any company or product. The opinions expressed during this event are solely those of NuGEN Technologies and do not represent the views of Harvard Catalyst, HC-LITT, HCCL, Harvard University and its affiliated academic health care centers, the National Center for Research Resources, or the National Institutes of Health.

  • January 30, 2012

    arrow-rightMedical Imaging: Seeing What Makes You Sick

    Time: 12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

    Location: Allen Room, (Building 36, Room 462), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307

    Session topic: Pulmonary imaging (cystic fibrosis as a model system)

    Imaging technologies (MRI, PET, CT, ultrasound, optical) are the cornerstones of medical practice. We will explore how they make physical properties of human tissues visible, highlighting current capabilities, limitations and the future potential of improvements to the technology. We will delve deeply into a physiological process such as angiogenesis and show how it is disrupted by disease focusing on how visualization through different imaging modalities has both advanced our understanding of the biology and contributed to improvements in healthcare. Sessions will focus on a specific example of how one imaging modality is used in the treatment of a cancer, or a neuropsychiatric, pulmonary or cardiovascular disorder. Each session will be led by a unique trio of experienced faculty members (an HMS affiliated clinical translational investigator using an imaging modality in their work, a hosting/collaborating MIT professor who has contributed to the development of that technology and a discussant who has sufficient knowledge and interest in the topic to generate a lively discussion.

    Presenters include: Randy Gollub (Course Instructor), Bruce Rosen, Georges El Fakhri, Steve Hyman, Jacob Hooker, Jeff Yap, Collin Stultz, José Venegas, Samuel Patz, David Sosnovik, Ron Blankstein, John Chen, David Alsop, Gottfried Schlaug, Scott Harris and others to be announced.

    Please note that enrollment is limited to 30 participants.


    Though this course has multiple sessions, participants are encouraged to attend the 1/9 session to gain the most from this course. Participants welcome at individual sessions.

    To register for the course, please contact Joseph R. Stein (E-Mail , 617-452-4091)

    To join the class via webex, click here.

    This course is co-sponsored by Harvard Catalyst and Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium. For more information, please visit the course website: http://mvisionconsortium.mit.edu/minicourse-medicalImaging