Please note that the Harvard Catalyst apps that use eCommons authentication are unaffected by the recent login changes made by Harvard University.

Events in January 2011

  • January 5, 2011

    arrow-rightIntroduction to microarrays and Affymetrix data analysis using R/Bioconductor

    Time: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The course is a general introduction to microarrays and the use of R/Bioconductor to carry out microarray data analysis. Following introduction the workshop starts with hands-on exercise on how to install R and Bioconductor GUI packages. The course is mainly based on the use of Bioconductor open source packages for analyzing single channel. R coding skill is not required since all the analysis are performed using AffylmGUI, LimmaGUI, and OneChannelGUI, a graphical interface to Bioconductor tools, designed for life scientists who are not familiar with R language. Students will learn how to carryout the following: quality control, normalization, filtering, statistical analysis, differential expression, and clustering analysis of Affymetrix data.

    Click here to register.

  • January 12, 2011

    arrow-rightIllumina microarray data analysis using R/Bioconductor

    Time: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Illumina microarrays are becoming a popular microarray platform. This workshop will demonstrate lumi package that provides an integrated solution for the bead-level Illumina microarray data analysis. The hands-on workshop covers data input, quality control, variance stabilization, normalization, and differential expression.

    Click here to register.

  • January 18, 2011

    arrow-rightCIMIT Forum: Risk-Reduction Incentive Programs to Enhance Integrated Clinical Practice

    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Amphitheater D, Armenise Building, Harvard Medical School, 210 Longwood Avenue, Boston

    CRICO (Controlled Risk Insurance Company/Risk Management Foundation) develops strategies to reduce errors and improve communication by supporting team training and simulation across the spectrum, including anesthesia, obstetrics, surgery and ambulatory care. Luke Sato, MD, chief medical officer and vice president of CRICO, and a panel of experts will discuss how a professional liability company uses incentives and grants to integrate teamwork and simulation into the fabric of clinical practice.

    Click here for more information. Hosted by CIMIT.

  • January 19, 2011

    arrow-rightTwo color [cDNA] microarray data analysis using R/Bioconductor

    Time: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    limmaGUI is a graphical user interface for Gordon Smyth’s limma package (Linear Models for MicroArray data). It uses state-of-the-art statistical techniques to normalize microarray data, perform diagnostic plots, and to find differentially expressed genes in complex experimental designs. The limmaGUI package offers a simple point-and-click interface to many of the commonly-used limma functions. The workshop focuses on performing quality control, normalization, filtering, statistical analysis, differential expression, and clustering analysis of two color data.

    Click here to register.

  • January 19, 2011

    arrow-rightEpigenetics: An Introduction and Applications

    Time: 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Room 3.110, Simches Research Building, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    This nanocourse, sponsored by the MGH Clinical Research Program and Harvard Catalyst, is intended for clinical research investigators at the fellow and faculty level. Distinguished faculty from MGH will provide introductory lectures defining epigenetics and its effect on gene regulation and inherited disease. CME credits are available for this nanocourse.

    Click here to register. Please contact Suzanne Powell (E-mail) with any questions.

  • January 20, 2011

    arrow-right“Rethinking Malaria: The Science of Eradiation Symposium”

    Time: 08:30 AM - 1:30 PM

    Location: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

    This symposium, hosted by the Harvard Institute for Global Health's Global Infectious Diseases Program, will provide an in-depth discussion of current control and eradication efforts. It will also serve as a forum to discuss recent scientific and policy advances, challenges, and new approaches to encourage interdisciplinary research in malaria. It will feature presentations and an expert panel discussion session. This will be the perfect setting for networking with faculty, students, researchers and invited guests.

    Space for this symposium is limited. For more information (including an agenda), or to register, visit the symposium website.

  • January 20, 2011

    arrow-rightWelcome to the Genetic Code

    Time: 12:30 PM - 5:00 PM

    Location: Bornstein Amphitheatre, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 45 Francis Street, Boston

    This introductory course will review fundamental language and concepts including DNA anatomy and genome organization; genotype-phenotype correlations; basic population genetics; and genotyping. Participants will have the opportunity to submit questions to the faculty prior to the lectures.

    Please click here to register. Please contact Lisa Horton if you have any questions or concerns.

    This module is offered collaboratively by Harvard Catalyst, the Center for Clinical Investigation at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Clinical Research Program at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    This course is part of a three module course series that covers both general and specialized topics in translational genetics, and which is designed to better acquaint clinicians and scientists with the tools and technologies of genetics and related fields. Participants are encouraged to sign up for the three courses in series. CME credits are available for all three courses.

  • January 20, 2011

    arrow-rightAnalysis of microRNA expression and function by a variety of techniques

    Time: 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators that silence gene expression by binding mainly to untranslated regions in the 3′ end of the target messenger RNA transcripts. This session will be useful for any researcher who wants to investigate miRNA’s in detail. Topics covered include basic techniques for miRNA isolation, expression profiling and validation, as well as their functional analysis in mammalian cells.

    Click here to register.

  • January 25, 2011

    arrow-rightWorkshop for Registered Nurses, Adv. Pract. Clinicians, & Nurse Faculty on Molecular Bio & Genetics

    Time: 08:30 AM - 5:00 PM

    Location: MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

    The workshop will cover the basic genetic processes that underlie the etiology of human disease. This knowledge is useful for providing the framework for assessing modern treatment and prevention strategies. Environmental effects on cell function will be highlighted.

    This workshop incorporates:

    • An active hands-on approach to learning molecular genetics concepts
    • Application of the molecular genetics concepts through two afternoon field trips: one to the Broad Institute for genomic sequencing, and another to a local biotech company for drug development
    • Keynote lecture by MIT’s Katharina Ribbeck, PhD, on the role that mucus and mucosal membranes play as a first line of defense in environmental health.

    Presented by MIT’s Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) and the Harvard Catalyst Clinical Research Center site at MIT.

    A $125 registration fee is required. Only 24 seats are available for this workshop. Nurses and medical professionals are welcome to attend. Nurses who complete the course will be eligible for 15 CEUs. Two scholarships are available for nursing students.

    For more information, or to register, visit the workshop’s web page.

  • January 25, 2011

    arrow-rightCIMIT Forum: Neuro Health Innovations: It Takes a Village

    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Room 3.110, Simches Research Building, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    Dr. John Williams, head of clinical activities and of neuroscience & mental health at the  Wellcome Trust, will speak on the “Role of Foundations in the Promotion of Cross-Disciplinary Research,” and Joseph Martin, MD, PhD, Edward R. and Anne G. Lefler Professor of Neurobiology and past dean of Harvard Medical School, will speak on “The Power of Academic Multi-Institutional Collaborations in Research.”

    Click here for more information. Hosted by CIMIT.

  • January 25, 2011

    arrow-rightA Workshop on Intellectual Property and Technology Transfer

    Time: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Room 3.130, Simches Research Building, Massachusetts General Hospital, 185 Cambridge Street, Boston

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators, Harvard University’s Office of Technology Transfer Development (OTD), and Partners Research Ventures and Licensing (RVL) cordially invite investigators interested in learning about intellectual property (patents in particular) and technology transfer to a workshop on Tuesday, January 25, 2011 at 4:00pm. We welcome researchers at all stages of their research and careers.

    The two-hour session will feature an overview of technology transfer and the resources available through the RVL and OTD to protect and develop ideas and partner with industry. In addition, a faculty speaker from the Harvard community will discuss his/her own technology transfer experiences. The event will close with an opportunity for smaller group or one-on-one discussions, in order for participants to learn more about the particular resources available to them.

    Attendance at this event is limited to 25 individuals, and registration is required. Attendees should RSVP by January 14, 2011. Please send your name, contact information, home department and institution, and a brief description of your research interests to Amy Webber (E-mail; 617-432-7810). We will include this information in a list of attendees that will be circulated at the event.

    The Harvard Catalyst Research Navigators are committed to providing opportunities for collaboration by organizing scientists and clinicians around research resources, areas of investigation, and disease topics. This event is part of a series of seminars and workshops designed to increase connectivity in the Harvard Catalyst community.

  • January 26, 2011

    arrow-rightWorkshop for Registered Nurses, Adv. Pract. Clinicians, & Nurse Faculty on Molecular Bio & Genetics

    Time: 08:30 AM - 5:00 PM

    Location: MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

    The workshop will cover the basic genetic processes that underlie the etiology of human disease. This knowledge is useful for providing the framework for assessing modern treatment and prevention strategies. Environmental effects on cell function will be highlighted.

    This workshop incorporates:

    • An active hands-on approach to learning molecular genetics concepts
    • Application of the molecular genetics concepts through two afternoon field trips: one to the Broad Institute for genomic sequencing, and another to a local biotech company for drug development
    • Keynote lecture by MIT’s Katharina Ribbeck, PhD, on the role that mucus and mucosal membranes play as a first line of defense in environmental health.

    Presented by MIT’s Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) and the Harvard Catalyst Clinical Research Center site at MIT.

    A $125 registration fee is required. Only 24 seats are available for this workshop. Nurses and medical professionals are welcome to attend. Nurses who complete the course will be eligible for 15 CEUs. Two scholarships are available for nursing students.

    For more information, or to register, visit the workshop’s web page.

  • January 26, 2011

    arrow-rightWhole transcript expression analysis using Gene and Exon 1.0 ST arrays

    Time: 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    Gene 1.0 ST Arrays are the latest product in the family of Affymetrix expression arrays offering whole-transcript coverage. Each gene is represented on the array by probes spread across the full length of the gene, providing a more complete and more accurate picture of gene expression than 3’-based expression array designs. The Exon Arrays allow for “exon-level” analysis and “gene-level” expression analysis on a single array. Multiple probes per exon enable “exon-level” analysis and allow you to distinguish between different isoforms of a gene. With “gene-level” expression analysis, multiple probes on different exons are summarized into an expression value of all transcripts from the same gene. The hands-on workshop will cover the following topics: installation of Affymetrix Power Tools and R/Bioconductor to normalized and summarize expression values, followed by quality control, filtering, and statistical and differential expression analysis using Bioconductor’s oneChannelGUI package.

    Click here to register.

  • January 26, 2011

    arrow-rightAn overview of REDCap

    Time: 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

    Location:

    Come learn about Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and REDCap Survey, two free, web-based data management tools available to Harvard investigators through the Harvard-affiliated academic health care centers. Using REDCap, investigators can create and design projects using:

    • A web browser-based Online Form Editor; and/or
    • An offline method by constructing and uploading a “data dictionary” template file in Microsoft Excel.

    Christian Botte, a Harvard Catalyst electronic data capture (EDC) support specialist based at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, will present a series of information sessions at Children’s Hospital Boston in November, December, and January on how to utilize the tools to build and manage online databases and surveys.

    REDCap provides automated export procedures for seamless data downloads to Excel and common statistical packages (SPSS, SAS, Stata, R), built-in project calendars, scheduling module, ad hoc reporting tools, and advanced features including branching logic, file uploading, field validations, and calculations.

    Presented by the Clinical Research Program Education Core at Children’s Hospital Boston, in collaboration with Harvard Catalyst.

    Registration is required in order to attend any of these three sessions. For more information, contact Harvard Catalyst EDC support specialist Christian Botte. To register, visit the Children’s Hospital Boston Clinical Research Program website.

  • January 27, 2011

    arrow-rightMaking the Most of the UCSC Genome Browser

    Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

    Location: Lower Level 2, Room 025, Countway Library, Harvard Medical School, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston

    The UCSC Genome Browser provides rapid, straight forward access to a vast store of genome-oriented material. Learn how to quickly locate gene information, gene features, how to download sequence and track information, and how to make use of the Table Browser to retrieve data in bulk. We’ll also examine other UCSC tools such as the Gene Sorter and VisiGene.

    Offered by Harvard Catalyst, the HMS Center for Biomedical Informatics, and the Countway Library of Medicine – operating jointly as the C3 Bioinformatics Initiative. To register for this or any of the other courses being offered currently by the C3 Bioinformatics initiative, visit the C3 education website. Please note that you will need to have your Harvard University PIN or HMS eCommons ID in order to register for these courses.

  • January 27, 2011

    arrow-rightBRI Translational Genetics Seminar: Jonathan Beckwith, PhD

    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Shapiro Board Room, Shapiro Cardiovascular Center, BWH, 70 Francis Street, Boston

    How We Came to Study the Genetics of the Warfarin-sensitive Step in Blood Clotting in E. coli

    Jonathan Beckwith, PhD
    American Cancer Society Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School

    The Center for Human Genetics in Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Biomedical Research Institute (BRI) continues its successful Translational Genetics Seminars with a talk by Jonathan Beckwith, PhD, on “How We Came to Study the Genetics of the Warfarin-Sensitive Step in Blood Clotting in E. coli,” a project supported by a Harvard Catalyst Pilot Grant.

    CME credits available. Light dinner will be served. Please email Anu Swaminathan (E-mail) to register.

    The Translational Genetics Seminar Series brings together clinicians and geneticists with talks that emphasize the relevance of genetics in medicine.

  • January 31, 2011

    arrow-right“Mis-measure of quality of IRBs”

    Time: 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM

    Location: Cannon Room, Building C, Harvard Medical School, 260 Longwood Avenue, Boston

    David M. Dilts, PhD, MBA, CMA
    Director of Clinical Research, the Knight Cancer Institute
    Co-director, the Center for Management Research in Healthcare
    Professor of Management
    The Oregon Health & Science University

    David Dilts is director of Clinical Research for the Knight Cancer Institute, professor of management and co-director of the Center for Management Research in Healthcare (cMRHc) at the Oregon Health & Science University. Formerly, he held the sole joint professorship between the Owen Graduate School of Management and the Vanderbilt University School of Engineering, where he was the founding Director of Engineering Management Program. Immediately prior to researching oncology clinical trials systems, his funded research was in assisting the retasking the Trident II D-5 Fleet Ballistic Missile. Prior research includes the use of: complexity theory to forecast the structure of the US automobile industry, event study methods to analyze the impact of quality certification on firm stock prices, real-options modeling to assess success factors for business incubation, and ordinal analysis techniques for optimal resource scheduling for specialty ambulatory clinics.

    His research center, cMRHc, co-directed by Alan Sandler, MD, supported in part by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), WebMD, and others, has as its mission the exchange of knowledge between the management research and healthcare to dramatically impact practice of medicine. One research stream is to apply management principles to significantly reduce the time and steps required to open oncology clinical trials. Another is to develop strategic performance metrics for portfolios of clinical trials, within and outside of oncology.

    His work has been published in nearly 200 articles, editorials, conference papers and presentations, book chapters, books and monographs, including in Clin Cancer Res, IEEE Trans on Engineering Management, J Clin Oncology, J of Med Info Assoc, J of Tech Transfer, Health Economics, J of Supply Chain Management, Management Accounting, Medical Decision Making, Nature Medicine, Optometry & Vision Science, and Tissue & Cell. Over the past fifteen years he has been PI or Co-PI on multiple million dollar grants from sources such as the NCI, the Department of Defense, and the Ontario Ministry of Health. He is on numerous editorial boards and a Certified Management Accountant. He is a frequent invited speaker at national and international conferences, and academic medical centers.

    His talk, “Mis-measure of quality of IRBs,” is hosted by Harvard Catalyst’s Ethics Program in Clinical & Translational Research (EPiCTR), which assists clinical and translational investigators, along with institutional representatives responsible for overseeing clinical and translational research, in clarifying and addressing ethical challenges that arise when designing or conducting research.

    Click here to register for this event. For more information, contact Nicole Santangelo (E-mail).